CDs

  • Out of stock
    CD1 1. Unknown Title 2. Give Me That Old Time Perversion 3. You Can Be Happy 4. Judy’s Smile 5. Questions And Answers CD2 1. Themeless Improvisation 2. Chant 3. Little Red Head 4. Day of Reckoning 5. Judy’s Smile 6. Unknown Title 7. Bruce’s Departure 8. Peaceful Farewell  
  • Disc One
    1. Introduction & Interview
    2. Saturday Night Fish Fry
    3. Interview on arrangements
    4. Yeh Yeh (1)
    5. Preach And Teach
    6. Interview on being #1
    7. Yeh Yeh (2)
    8. Tell All The World About You
    9. Let The Sunshine In
    10. Interview on success in USA
    11. In The Meantime (1)
    12. Point Of No Return (1)
    13. Telegram
    14. Yeh Yeh (3)
    15. Interview on Johnny Burch
    16. In The Meantime (2)
    17. Get On The Right Track, Baby
    18. Interview on the follow up
    19. Like We Used To Be (1)
    20. Rockin‘ Pneumonia Boogie Woogie Flu
    21. No No
    22. Move It On Over
    23. Interview on dancing
    24. Like We Used To Be (2)
    25. Monkeying Around
    26. Point Of No Return (2)
    27. Interview on John Mayall
    28. Something
    29. Ride Your Pony
    30. The World Is Round
    31. Interview on jazz
    32. My Girl
    33. Boot-leg
     
    Disc Two
    1. Interview on Sweet Thing
    2. Sweet Thing (1)
    3. Funny How Time Slips Away
    4. See-Saw
    5. Uptight
    6. Interview with Lulu
    7. Call Me
    8. You'll Never Leave Him
    9. Interview on Get Away
    10. Get Away (1)
    11. Last Night
    12. Close The Door
    13. Interview on going to USA
    14. Get Away (2)
    15. Sweet Thing (2)
    16. Sunny (1)
    17. Interview on Sound Venture
    18. Dawn Yawn
    19. Lovey Dovey
    20. Papa’s Got A Brand New Bag
    21. Interview on Harry South
    22. Keep Your Big Mouth Shut
    23. Three Blind Mice
    24. Do The Dog
    25. Interview on end of the Blue Flames
    26. Because I Love You
    27. Point Of No Return (3)
    28. Waiting Time
    29. Interview on New York
    30. El Pussycat
    31. Sunny (2)
     
  • Out of stock

    Instrumentals Soul-Style? What do you mean Soul Instrumentals? How can an instrumental be soul? Hold on a minute - what's the line-up? James Brown, Ray Charles, Allen Toussaint, Junior Walker, Booker T & the MGs, King Curtis, Ike & Tina Turner. What have we got here? Club Sounds. A bit of funk, a Latin groove, a slow jazz walk, uptown dancers, late night smoochers. Instrumentals Soul-Style. Got it?

    Now here’s a crackerjack of a compilation with a lot of relatively rare instrumentals of a soul bias alongside many genre classics. It’s February as I write these notes but already this must be a contender for best compilation of the year. Davy Peckett New Gandy Dancer

    This is a wisely selected, carefully sequenced and beautifully presented collection of late 50s/early 60s instrumentals with a soulful feel and fronts an informative and attractive 28-page booklet. You’re really going to enjoy this. And the great thing is that apart from making several wonderful new finds, this is such a superb album for listening right through. Anyone who has any of the History of R&B or History of Soul label releases will be well aware of their quality and the care that goes into them and Instrumentals Soul-Style is a real gem for instrumental hounds – I love it! Alan Taylor Pipeline

    SOUL012 Produced as CD-R (professionally manufactured recordable CD printed for short run) as opposed to CD-P (professionally manufactured pressed CDs made in quantities of 500+). All CDs whether CD-R or CD-P are 100% guaranteed error free. Discs will always be replaced if any problems are encountered.
  • Sale!
    As the UK fired up to the 'White Heat' predicted by its new Prime Minister Harold Wilson, the nation's jazz scene was already aglow with talent, both established and up and coming. Indeed, London was a boiling crucible of jazz invention, mixing R&B, Hard Bop and a pinch of the Avant-Garde to forge its very own alchemic brand of jazz. Soho Scene '64/'65 captures this moment perfectly, a time when The Beatles and Bond were both new and fresh and when Brit-Jazz sounded as colourful and swinging as anything sashaying down Carnaby Street. Booklet notes by Simon Spillett RANDB058 I love this series. Since every track is different, dynamic and tasty, you can listen straight through without ever looking up… Where American big-band jazz trailed off in the early 1960s Britain continued to develop the genre further and with gusto… the U.S. sides are funky and off the beaten path, making for a wonderful juxtaposition between jazz evolution in London and the U.S. during the exact same two-year period. It's all here on this new set and series. Grab your Lambrettas! Marc Myers Jazzwax.com Produced as CD-R (professionally manufactured recordable CD printed for short run) as opposed to CD-P (professionally manufactured pressed CDs made in quantities of 500+). Comes with original printed CD inner plus booklet annotated by Simon Spillett. All CDs whether CD-R or CD-P are 100% guaranteed error free. Discs will always be replaced if any problems are encountered.  
  • Out of stock
    1. Around And Around
    2. Off The Hook
    3. Time Is On My Side
    4. It's All Over Now
    5. I'm Alright
    6. Let's Get Together
    7. Carol
    8. Not Fade Away
    9. Carol
    10. Mona
    11. Not Fade Away
    12. High Heel Sneakers
    13. I Just Want To Make Love To You
    14. Ad Break – Rice Krispies
    15. I Wanna Be Your Man
    16. You Better Move On
    17. Roll Over Beethoven
    18. Beautiful Delilah
    19. Around And Around
    20. Time Is on My Side
    21. Not Fade Away
    22. I Just Want To Make Love To You
    23. I'm Alright
    24. I Just Want To Make Love To You
    25. Not Fade Away
    26. Not Fade Away (take 1)
    27. Beautiful Delilah
    28. Walking The Dog
    29. High Heel Sneakers
    30. Susie Q
    31. Mona
    32. High Heel Sneakers/Not Fade Away
    33. I'm Movin' On
  • Pianist Michael Garrick was among the most boldly ambitious British jazz figures of the late-1960s, tirelessly pioneering various new fusions uniting his first love – straight-ahead jazz – with Indian music, liturgy and poetry. Featuring two previously unreleased sessions taped in 1967 and 1969, this album charts the course of his music from post-bop convention towards an indisputably ‘English’ jazz sound. Containing provocative live versions of several well-known Garrick compositions and an all-star cast, it truly captures the era in which UK jazz began to loosen its collar and let down its hair. RANDB076
  • Sale!
    Clarksdale, Mississippi: birthplace of Ike Turner, Sam Cooke, John Lee Hooker and Son House and home to five taverns visited by Library of Congress researcher Lewis Wade Jones in 1941. In each of these taverns, the Chicken Shack, the Dipsie Doodle, Lucky's, the Messenger's Cafe, and the New Africa, a jukebox. In each jukebox, a choice of records, painstakingly listed by Jones, who figured it was worth it. And now, sitting down in the comfort of your own home, you can pull yourself a beer and listen to the sounds that a 29 year-old Muddy Waters from nearby Stovall might have heard on a night out in Clarksdale on 9th September, 1941. Thanks, Lewis! After reading the impeccable illustrated booklet, all that’s left is to close the eyes, leaving for Clarksdale in 1941, push open the door to any tavern and slip a coin into the music box...magic! Le Pied This is not only a great collection of music it's a significant historical document. A delightful and truly fascinating collection. Frank Scott Roots & Rhythm While the sound has been cleaned up it still has that period warmth and feel which adds to the authenticity. There's occasional surface noise but nothing that gets in the way of enjoying the music. The 18 page booklet has details for each single--title, composer, artist, label, recording date--plus an essay reprinted from 1971 that includes pertinent information about the music/era, and a few photos of performers and other pertinent ephemera. This set is worth five "stars" not only because of the music/artists found that day, but also for the Rhythm and Blues label having the foresight and the chestnuts to release something as important as this. Blues fans looking for authentic music, the kind that patrons of those five clubs listened to using their hard earned nickels in juke boxes, as they drank with friends will find many surprises found on those juke boxes. This collection is from a two year field study of culture in the Mississippi Delta region during the summers of '41 and '42 in conjunction with the Archive of American Folk Song--Library of Congress & Fisk University. If you're a deep blues fan read "Lost Delta Found" and there you'll see one section that lists "Records on Machines in Clarksdale Amusement Places", that lists all the songs. Obviously this collection is the real-deal authentic music heard in that region (and no doubt other areas) in the 1940's. There's no guess work, no random inclusion of songs/performers that fit comfortably in the "juke joint" mould of what people may envision as from that era. Because of the authenticity of the cultural study and Jones' work, this is one of the most important (and eye-opening) collections of music in the blues genre. Plus it makes for darn good listening. Blues fans/blues scholars will have a field day with this fine set--it upsets what many of us thought "juke joint music" was. But the juke box changed all that. It's the music that working people heard after a day of hard work while drinking and relaxing with their friends. On all accounts this collection has to be one of the most authentic, important releases in the blues genre for 2016. Many tracks aren't what people may think of as juke joint music, but the juke box ushered in a new era of music in taverns and local joints all across the South. But more than that--it's just great music. Stuart Jefferson Amazon RANDB036  
  • Aside from the music, one of the richest pleasures to be found here is Nick Duckett’s comprehensive and astute liner notes. It’s in Duckett’s writing almost as much as in the songs themselves, that we truly get a feel for the skill, craftsmanship and musical acumen that characterized the work of Henry Glover. Virtually every song in this compilation is addressed, often with in-depth discussions of how Glover crafted the rhythmic patterns, instrumental voicings and textures, and the multi-genre cross-pollinations and borrowings that made this music come alive…Everyone from hard-core aficionados to more mainstream fans who simply love good R&B and blues from the mid-century golden age to the dawning of rock’n’roll will find this an essential addition to their collection. David Whiteis Living Blues Henry Glover was the first producer/writer in the American music industry, paving the way for a host of illustrious followers such as Phil Spector, Leiber & Stoller and Burt Bacharach. Composer, producer, arranger, publisher, talent scout, vocalist, trumpet player, engineer, A&R executive, and, later, a label owner in his own right, Glover was one of the most talented music industry entrepreneurs of the twentieth century. The fact that he was black and working in an exclusively white executive environment makes his achievements all the more remarkable. Glover’s formative years were spent at Cincinnati-based King Records and the majority of hits on that label during its golden era from 1947 to 1958 were Henry Glover productions. He was equally at home with white and black music. His pioneering work with Moon Mullican and Hawkshaw Hawkins combining blues and country predates Elvis Presley’s Sun recordings by several years. Glover tried his hand at doo-wop and rock’n’roll music, but he found his greatest success in the dance craze era of the early 1960s. In later years, Glover channelled his energies into forming his own record label (he launched the careers of The Hawks, who mutated into The Band, and of Nick Ashford). One of his last productions was Muddy Waters’s swansong The Woodstock Album, which won a Grammy in 1975. This 4CD set contains 125 Henry Glover songs sung by Bill Doggett, Bull Moose Jackson, Champion Jack Dupree, The Checkers, Delmore Brothers, Eddie 'Cleanhead' Vinson, Hank Ballard, Joey Dee, Little Willie John, Lucky Millinder, Lula Reed, Moon Mullican, Roy Brown, Ray Charles, Sonny Thompson, The Swallows, Tiny Bradshaw, Wynonie Harris, The 5 Royales and many more… Includes 28-page booklet RANDB0200 The collection is an absolute cracker. Fred Rothwell - Blues & Rhythm Produced as CD-R (professionally manufactured recordable CD printed for short run) as opposed to CD-P (professionally manufactured pressed CDs made in quantities of 500+). Comes with 28-page booklet. All CDs whether CD-R or CD-P are 100% guaranteed error free. Discs will always be replaced if any problems are encountered.  
  • Out of stock
    Includes fully illustrated 24page booklet. There’s so little on this box set that I wouldn’t be overjoyed to play you… an absolutely essential purchase. Mark Lamarr BBC Radio Two Fellow addicts will already have many of the tracks, but purchasing them again to have them put in the context of blues development should be a joy rather than a hardship.… As a whole package, it is irresistible and should be an essential on the shopping list of all self respecting r’n’b junkies. David Innes R2 The History of Rhythm and Blues 1942-52 is just splendid, it's a labour of love and a work of supreme scholarship, put together by people who obviously care. From boogie men to boppers, hillbilly's to honkers it is beautifully programmed and has polished some dusty old gems into a relevant and modern work of art. Compilations of the music of any genre from history are ten a penny these days, thrown together with little thought for anything bar profit. This is something else, something very special indeed. It realises that recorded music has a place in social history, its own mythology, a narrative and in its four discs and lovingly annotated 68 page book, it tells that story. So as well as the fabulous and joyful music, we get thoughts on the development of radio, the race laws of early 20th century America and the migration of workers, the jukebox phenomenon and even technical information about patterns in the 12 bar blues form. The compilers of this set have created a desirable object every bit as a precious as a memory, as valuable as a necklace, they are heroes of the gramophone, the record player, the cd machine. Just buy it, you won't go far wrong. Ian Clayton Among a plethora of such comps…frankly, it’s probably the best of its kind. Whether you want to learn more about the genre or have been listening for years, this collection leaves others eating its dust. Laith Al-Kaisy Record Collector RANDB048
  • Sale!
    Includes fully illustrated booklet. Clarksdale, Mississippi: birthplace of Ike Turner, Sam Cooke, John Lee Hooker and Son House and home to five taverns visited by Library of Congress researcher Lewis Wade Jones in 1941. In each of these taverns, the Chicken Shack, the Dipsie Doodle, Lucky's, the Messenger's Cafe, and the New Africa, a jukebox. In each jukebox, a choice of records, painstakingly listed by Jones, who figured it was worth it. And now, sitting down in the comfort of your own home, you can pull yourself a beer and listen to the sounds that a 29 year-old Muddy Waters from nearby Stovall might have heard on a night out in Clarksdale on 9th September, 1941. Thanks, Lewis! After reading the impeccable illustrated booklet, all that’s left is to close th eyes, leaving for Clarksdale in 1941, push open the door to any tavern and slip a coin into the music box...magic! Le Pied It’s a brilliant idea, but of course, it stands or falls by the quality of the music on offer. But it stands...boy does it stand...this is blues as pure unadulterated joy...the history crackles from the speakers and blues fans – and indeed fans of good music generally – should beat a path to this album forthwith. Jeremy Searle R2   This is not only a great collection of music it's a significant historical document. A delightful and truly fascinating collection. Frank Scott Roots & Rhythm Overall across the four discs (77 +, 76 +, 74 +, 75 + minutes each) the sound is good/bordering on very good--especially for so many recordings from several labels--recorded from 1938-1941. While the sound has been cleaned up it still has that period warmth and feel which adds to the authenticity. There's occasional surface noise but nothing that gets in the way of enjoying the music. The 18 page booklet has details for each single--title, composer, artist, label, recording date--plus an essay reprinted from 1971 that includes pertinent information about the music/era, and a few photos of performers and other pertinent ephemera. This set is worth five "stars" not only because of the music/artists found that day, but also for the Rhythm and Blues label having the foresight and the chestnuts to release something as important as this. Blues fans looking for authentic music, the kind that patrons of those five clubs listened to using their hard earned nickels in juke boxes, as they drank with friends will find many surprises found on those juke boxes. This collection is from a two year field study of culture in the Mississippi Delta region during the summers of '41 and '42 in conjunction with the Archive of American Folk Song--Library of Congress & Fisk University. If you're a deep blues fan read "Lost Delta Found" and there you'll see one section that lists "Records on Machines in Clarksdale Amusement Places", that lists all the songs. Obviously this collection is the real-deal authentic music heard in that region (and no doubt other areas) in the 1940's. There's no guess work, no random inclusion of songs/performers that fit comfortably in the "juke joint" mould of what people may envision as from that era. Because of the authenticity of the cultural study and Jones' work, this is one of the most important (and eye-opening) collections of music in the blues genre. Plus it makes for darn good listening. Blues fans/blues scholars will have a field day with this fine set--it upsets what many of us thought "juke joint music" was. But the juke box changed all that. It's the music that working people heard after a day of hard work while drinking and relaxing with their friends. On all accounts this collection has to be one of the most authentic, important releases in the blues genre for 2016. Many tracks aren't what people may think of as juke joint music, but the juke box ushered in a new era of music in taverns and local joints all across the South. But more than that--it's just great music. Stuart Jefferson Amazon RANDB036 BONUS CD available free if you order the set from us direct
  • Sale!
    An excellent invitation to this ground-breaking music. Well worth tracking down. Gary Von Tersch Big City Rhythm & Blues R&B records is one of those dedicated labels which just keeps on giving. The first five volumes of this assiduously researched and compiled series have been an utter revelation, opening up corners of R&B history many of us never knew existed. Seeing as the term ‘R&B’ wasn’t invented in 1938, some of us could be forgiven for imagining that the genre we later became familiar with didn’t stretch back past the 1940s. How wrong we’d be. Throughout this amazing collection there’s more great names than you can shake a stick at. Spending an evening in with this quartet of discs and a few beers is a fine way to spend your time - and there are new names here offering new thrills. And all this, before I was born. Those were the days, indeed. Essential listening! Roy Bainton Blues Matters Now here we are really talking about going back to the roots with World War II lurking just around the corner…there is a sense of early rock'n'roll with The Golden Gate Jubilee and Bob Wills…Big Noise From Winnetka with Bauduc & Haggard is really Big Noise with is a stand-up bass that any rockabilly bassist in the world would be jealous of…The raw guitar sound on Blind Boy Fuller’s "You've Got To Move It On" I think will never be recreated... After listening through the collection you should understand how everything is interrelated. How Chuck Berry got his sound and how, among other things, Beatles and Rolling Stones became what they became. A collection of canons in my opinion and a booklet accompanies the records where there is very good info about the artists and the groups. Jonas Andersson American Music Magazine I have listened to almost nothing but this chronology in the past evenings, but I still feel that I have only just been knocking at the door of a rich treasure trove. Famous names and well-known songs are alternated with rare and unexpected tracks on the four CDs. What makes these sets so special is that they are not a dry and dusty exercise in musical archeology. What they present will be a revelation even for the most enthusiastic R & B enthusiast. Eric Schuurmans Rootsville   RANDB047
  • Here’s a selection of cracking R&B instrumentals, and scarcely a chart hit amongst them. Guitar-led rockers from the West Coast, with fiery picking and heavy blues/rock riffs from Johnny Talbot, Travis Wammack and Roy Buchanan and some early fuzzbox action from Lou Josie of the Ho-Dads. There’s Louisiana sounds from Mac “Dr. John” Rebennack and Robert Parker with Mid-West guitar grooves by Tommy Tucker, Freddy King and Little Milton. Up in New York, you’ve got B.B. King, Wild Jimmy Spruill, and King Curtis blowing out on Soul Train. Dave Lewis and The Exotics were from Seattle and there’s even a Canadian group, future comedian Tommy Chong’s Little Daddy & The Bachelors. These are the records Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page, Dave Davies, Jeff Beck et al were listening to in 1964. An extra 2CD set is available as a free bonus only if bought direct from us. RANDB053 Sheer eye-opening delight…Its absolute playability is amazing. There’s little need to press the skip button, just sit back and enjoy. Alan Taylor Pipeline
  • Something Quieter: 1962 – The British Perspective by Simon Spillett As for our own jazzmen – stick to listening in the clubs. They are twice themselves there. Readers letter to Melody Maker, October 6th 1963 It was an affront! Nothing less than an insult! An unnecessary and totally incongruous modernistic excrescence arbitrarily grafted onto what was one of the nation’s favourite radio programmes. How dare the BBC tinker with this hallowed ground, trying to tart it up to make it more in keeping with contemporary tastes. If the change to the programme title were not bad enough, then what was this?! – a new signature tune, all garish jazzy harmonies and such. Whatever next?! Outraged of Tunbridge Wells wasn't merely upset, he was incandescent! So went public the reaction to the BBC's re-branding of Mrs Dale's Diary as The Dales in February 1962. The show’s new theme music – an offending burst of modern big band jazz - had been written by none other than John Dankworth, then riding high on the recent success of African Waltz, the chart-friendliness of which had thrust him – always one of the more palatable UK modernists – further towards the realms of the establishment. Indeed, profiled in Melody Maker the same month as The Dales first aired, it was clear that at least for Dankworth and his wife, vocalist Cleo Laine, modern jazz was now providing a living far removed from the starving-in-a-garret clichés normally pedalled by the press. “The couple live in Woburn Sands, Bedfordshire” the paper reported, “and run two cars – an A40 and a Zephyr...” Although the BBC were to junk his new theme to The Dales within a matter of months, following an avalanche of letters requesting “something quieter”, Dankworth's radio commission was the latest sign that modern jazz in Britain was at last finding its feet. Those same feet were now also gaining ground across the Atlantic. A Melody Maker headline at the beginning of the year shouted America is Booking British, detailing how the Anglo-US exchange deal begun the previous autumn was now gearing up to return Tubby Hayes to New York, soon to be followed by Ronnie Scott, Jimmy Deuchar and Ronnie Ross. Barely a few months before, all this would have seemed impossible. And it wasn't only the British who'd welcomed the trade-off. Even America's jazz bible DownBeat noted the wisdom of the exchange; “If England'll accept, I'm all for sending Noel Coward back and taking Tubby Hayes,” wrote one of its columnists. “Come to think of it, I'm all for sending Noel Coward back whether they give us Tubby or not.” But for the Englishmen back home in London it was to be an all too brief moment in the noon-day sun. In May 1962, just five months after it had proudly unveiled Dankworth's new Dales-theme, the BBC summarily banned what it termed “uninhibited modern jazz” from its Light Programme scheduling, partly a reflection on the audience figures the network had accrued when latterly presenting traditional jazz bands, partly out of a fear that modernism was a pernicious force undermining the corporation’s strict, Reithian edicts. “I'm not asking Tubby Hayes to make a commercial sound like Victor Sylvester,” said producer Terry Henebery, as if in mitigation, “but there are limits.” The almighty row that exploded in the pages of the jazz press following the ban – in which Dankworth himself compared the BBC's policy to apartheid – was also accompanied by an on-going one about how these same modernists presented themselves in public. The argument was an old one, namely that Britain's modern jazz musicians appeared to believe the world owed them a living. “Whose fault if no-one wants modern jazz?”, asked one Melody Maker piece, laying the blame squarely at the feet of the players themselves. Sam Kruger, boss of The Flamingo, had had enough of the studied indifference displayed by many of those he employed, railing against the way “[they] dress in a slovenly way, smoke on stage and play endless choruses”. The musicians tried to fight back. “We must present ourselves properly and have more confidence,” remarked the Jamaican altoist Harold McNair, as if waking to smell the coffee. “It doesn't mean lowering standards – just more communication.” Even those who might not otherwise have appeared to give a damn about Brit-Bop waded in, with one, Trad demigod Acker Bilk, providing a characteristically pithy piece of advice. “If British modernists saw [Gerry] Mulligan,” wrote Bilk after a trip to New York, “they would understand that modern jazz is as much a part of show-business as trad or pop.” Trad and pop, however, weren't getting the brush off from the record industry. The top-selling UK jazz album of 1962 – itself an almost totemic representation of the entire Trad movement - was The Best of Barber and Bilk. British modern jazz LPs on the other hand continued to be rare as hens' teeth. For example, that year, Ember released just two new modern albums by Tony's Kinsey and Crombie, and while Fontana continued its valuable patronage of Tubby Hayes, for many other local jazzmen, the story continued to be one of A&R neglect. Nothing was clear cut though. Indeed, looking at recording activity covering the three strands comprising the fabric of modernism at this juncture – cool, bop and the blues-driven end of mainstream – there is as much contradiction as conformity. Again, some thought the music at fault, others the musicians. One unidentified record producer told Bob Dawbarn that he was now loathe to book “a modern jazz group three months ahead [as] I know I will see an entirely different band of musicians [on the session] – if the group still exists at all.” Another mover and shaker, Pete Burman, mastermind of the Jazz Tete a Tete concert packages believed too much emphasis had been placed on chasing the cutting edge of Hard Bop. “I wonder if this intimate, rather formal sort of jazz” he wrote of the music he presented – played by the likes of Johnny Scott and Pat Smythe - “isn't perhaps the kind British musicians are best at.” He had a point; or maybe he didn't. When Philips' Johnny Franz signed saxophonist Tony Coe's Quintet – a group able to straddle several stylistic camps - to a one-shot LP deal in summer 1962, Coe found no such reservations about what might sell, with his producer actively encouraging him to cover the gamut. “[He] was wonderfully sympathetic,” he said of Franz in a Melody Maker interview. “Musically he gave us our heads [and accordingly] most of what was used were first takes.” Coe's relaxed experience in the studio was an unusual one for a British modernist, but with a repertoire incorporating Cannonball Adderley, Kenny Burrell and Sonny Rollins, his band was playing music typifying the definite shift towards harder, earthier playing that was now the trend in London's jazz clubs. However, regardless of how spirited the music in these venues may have been at this, the last point in musical history in which soul remained an adjective rather than a noun, there were those who continued to see it all as a phoney, fashion-fitting pretence. “A British jazzman must make a living, with audiences and colleagues largely conditioned to Transatlantic fashion,” wrote Kitty Grime in January 1962, explaining the dilemma faced by virtually every local modernist. Pianist Eddie Thompson – who having finally tired of the impediments of the UK jazz circuit, upped sticks permanently to New York around the same time – was even more direct. “You cannot afford to be original here,” he observed wistfully, “I could go no further in Britain.” Another English jazzman - one making the reverse journey after years in the States - bassist Peter Ind, also saw things with a refreshing clarity. “They seem to forsake their own originality for an imitation of whichever American jazz star is currently popular,” he said of the colleagues with whom he'd been reunited, “thus, we have many little Miles’s, Coltrane's and Cannonball's around, all vying for attention.” Perhaps the most vociferous critic of all was Danny Halperin, Jazz News' resident curmudgeon, who took every opportunity available to swipe at the locals. Having dismissed the London club scene in the autumn of 1962 as “a dreary succession of dimly-lit miniature steam baths peopled by drags”, he then delighted in tearing a strip off of several of the capital’s leading lights. “I wouldn't give you a plugged farthing for any of them. Yes, and I mean that tenor man who runs changes till the cows come home. Also I mean that charming bandleader who plays the most wooden alto this side of heaven.” But, as the year drew to a close, it was to be that same “charming bandleader” who was to prove himself more man of steel than saxophonist of wood. In fact, during the very same week that John F. Kennedy faced down the Soviets, John W. Dankworth stood up against an equally formidable foe – the BBC. Having relaxed its ban on modern jazz somewhat during the late summer months, the corporation had engaged Dankworth's band to appear on its Jazz Club programme on October 11th. During rehearsal, one of the bandleader’s pieces – Freeway, a quintet feature for Kenny Wheeler – had been vetoed by producer Terry Henebery as “too advanced for Jazz Club”. Come the broadcast, Dankworth was asked to restore the piece to the show’s playlist, which he flatly refused to do – live on air – resulting in the programme under-running and a flustered response from compère Alan Dell. Was it a protest at the stylistic vacillations of the corporation? - a held-over response to their earlier outright ban on modern jazz? - or even a fit of pique over them scrapping his theme for The Dales? The answer was simple: Dankworth was standing up not just for his music, but for himself, showing the genuine grit which British jazz was so often said to lack. “If I am well-known for anything,” he had written earlier in 1962, “it is certainly not for obeying rules.” It was clearly a watershed moment, a very public display of the “more confidence” Harold McNair had thought was woefully absent in many local jazzmen. Indeed, at the end of the year – twelve months that had mixed controversy, confrontation and consolidation in equal measure – Britain's modernists had come out stronger than ever. Battle-scarred but undimmed, now all they needed was a wider audience. Maybe 1963 would be their year, after all? Simon Spillett July 2017 RANDB035
  • An exemplary tribute to an unjustly neglected figure - Richard Williams A perfect potted history of the period - Dave Gelly, The Observer An overdue recognition of the genius of Harry South and the world class calibre of the musicians he worked with. An important landmark in British Jazz and indispensable to any collection. – Eddie Little Superb tribute to a stalwart jazz pianist,composer and arranger. Excellent booklet notes by saxophonist Simon Spillett. Highly recommended – Amazon Superbly annotated, this is a reissue of exemplary quality – Peter Vacher, Jazz Rag The Songbook is the definitive Harry South release…makes a strong case for South’s musical contributions to jazz…Lovers of modern big band jazz will find much to discover in this well-conceived set.  Scott Yanow - The New York City Jazz Record RANDB040
  • THE HARRY SOUTH BIG BAND WITH GEORGIE FAME AND THE DICK MORRISSEY QUARTET When the BBC invited pianist/composer and arranger Harry South to front his own big band for a special edition of its flagship radio programme Jazz Club in 1960, few could have predicted the broadcast’s fall-out. Although the Beeb would offer a similar helping hand to other British jazzmen in the decade ahead – making big band leaders of a range of leading figures from Humphrey Lyttelton to Stan Tracey – none of these other bands evolved quite like South's. Beginning as a showcase for his distinctive, often darkly dramatic, original material, and operating as a 'jobs for the boys' forum for those British modernists he felt closest too (among them Tubby Hayes, Dick Morrissey and Joe Harriott) the sheer clout of South's star-packed aggregation ensured it soon attracted interest from outside the normally closed borders of jazz purism. Indeed, when Yeh Yeh hitmaker Georgie Fame decided to pursue his wider musical ambitions, he chose South and his big band as his collaborators, creating the album Sound Venture, a cross-over classic that has become one of the iconic LPs of the decade. Assembled from South's own tape archive, and featuring a wealth of PREVIOUSLY UNISSUED material, including NINE killer Georgie Fame tracks, Further South is both a prequel and sequel to that landmark achievement, a four-disc document of one of the most vibrant times in British music, a souvenir from the days when Swinging London created its very own sound from a heady amalgam of small band Hard Bop, Big Band Swing, R&B and Soul. Containing no fewer than ten complete radio sessions by South's big band (and two by the Dick Morrissey Quartet) and packaged with rare period photographs and an extensive booklet essay by award-winning saxophonist and author Simon Spillett, this set is a must-have for all fans of British modernism. RANDB051 These Harry South Big Band broadcast recordings contain modern big band jazz of quite extraordinary power and dynamism - rarely, if ever, equalled since. The Band - led by conductor/arranger/composer South- has just about every modern jazz star of the 1960's including such luminaries as Tubby Hayes,Ronnie Scott and Dick Morrissey in the sax sections on offer. The Band rips it up on just about every track and culminates - in CD 4 - with Georgie Fame at the microphone with the band in full swing behind him. All in all, a truly remarkable catalogue of music making. But, a word of warning, these recordings are of BBC broadcasts of "Jazz Club" and (I believe) are taken from tapes made of the various transmissions by Harry South himself and are definitely not "Hi-Fi" or anything approaching it - but they are nevertheless priceless in their rarity and musical excellence. In addition to the Big Band broadcasts there are some wonderful sessions recorded by the Dick Morrissey Quartet with no less than Harry South himself on piano and the titanic drumming of Phil Seaman on offer. All in all a fitting tribute to a marvellous set of musicians playing at the peak of their powers in the 1960's - with the caveat for the audiophiles alongst us as to the far less then perfect sound reproduction! Jonny Dee
  • CD1 KINKS BEGINNINGS 1 CD2 STORY OF A SONG CD3 KINKS BEGINNINGS 2 ‘I advise you to listen with the liner notes handy' Doug Hinman This CD set presents on two discs, the songs that were most influential on the sound of the early Kinks and also the original versions of those songs the group have played in concert over the years. The additional disc focuses on recordings which influenced the creation of You Really Got Me. 32-page booklet explaining the relevance of each track to The Kinks. RANDB046
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    1954-1962 The Golden Age of southern soul lasted from about 1964 to 1975, when disco ripped the heart out of it. Although it may seem as if the blend of country, gospel and R & B that emerged from the great studios in Memphis and Muscle Shoals in that decade was entirely new, like any other genre, southern soul absorbed influences from a whole variety of sources. Part of the 'History of Soul' series, these CDs reveal the musical antecedents that gave southern soul its inspiration. A good few of the artists here, represented in their early attempts at creating an individual style, went on to become some of the biggest stars of the '60s. Others, perhaps less famously, provided ideas and techniques that became stylistic standards. If you ever wondered what musical forms anticipated the southern soul explosion, the answer is in these tracks. If you thought that secularised gospel started with Sam Cooke and Ray Charles, think again as you listen to vocalists who pioneered this many years before them. And if you imagined that the producers at Royal Studios, or Fame or Cosimo's in New Orleans invented something completely unprecedented, you were missing something. The accompanying booklet is written by John Ridley. The music here will tell you the real story – and it will knock your socks off too!

    'Listening to the impressive tracks on these 2 CDs, and reading through the full colour 28 page booklet that accompanies it, these influences are mostly easy to identify and associate with. The overall standard of these 54 tracks is amazingly high and there are hours of fun to be had here, in the unlikely event that you ever tire of this collection, there is always the rest of the series to catch up with!' Red Lick Records

    Soul 002 & 017 Where Southern Soul Began 1 & 2 'These two 2-cd volumes are a fine way to trace the roots of what we now call 'southern soul', beginning back in 1954 through to 1962,.I immediately want to deliver a 'star pick' rating to the first volume., ultimately, its clear that the two sets are highly complimentary, excellently presented and really should be sitting together on the record shelves.' STAR PICK***** x2. Bob Cole Basement Group Review

    SOUL002
  • 36 Page illustrated booklet.

    By the beginning of 1963, African-American music in New Orleans was in flux. Its happy-go-lucky R & B sound was no longer guaranteed to hit the national charts. In short, the good times in the city had run out of steam. The major issue now was what sort of music to record in the wake of the “British Invasion”. The answer of course was “soul”. Until soul became the ubiquitous African-American musical style, the music that was recorded in the city was a Louisiana gumbo of blues, R & B, gospel, swamp pop, anything and everything that might sell a few records.

    This set of CDs is the story of how one city, New Orleans, with its unique, proud and energetic history came to adopt soul music and how its music producers and arrangers came to utilise the styles of soul music being made in other cities of the US and to adapt them to the rhythms and approaches that made New Orleans so different to every other soul city USA.

    These CDs are also a tribute to the little labels, whose sound became the heartbeat of the city, playing out onto the streets from jukeboxes, radio stations and mom-and-pop stores selling a few 45s as a sideline. Most of the tracks on these CDs have never been released since the day that the vinyl was first stamped. This is New Orleans African-American music at its most potent. The sound of the young of the city as they heard it and played it two generations ago. RANDB052 You could drop the coin on any disc at random hear something hot. Fred Rothwell Blues & Rhythm With this latest History Of Soul release, New Orleans music fans should be in seventh heaven. David Cole Soul Basement
  • Virtuoso blues guitarist Bobby Parker inspired John Lennon, Eric Clapton, Carlos Santana, Jimmy Page and many others yet it has taken 66 years since his recording debut for a proper compilation to be issued under his name. The one you all know, Watch your Step was played on stage by the Beatles in their Hamburg days who by their own admission, took its riff to fashion the opening to I Feel Fine. And let’s not forget Led Zeppelin’s Moby Dick, which borrowed that same riff. What a great soulful blues singer Bobby Parker was too. From his 1956 recording of Titanic, to 1969’s It's Hard But It's Fair, we present some unforgettable vocal performances plus guitar instrumentals that showcase his unique way of playing the blues. And there are some unreleased live performances from a radio show broadcast in 1995. Bobby Parker originals are hard to come by – apart from the hit Watch your Step, everything else is a valuable collector’s item. But this compilation brings them all together in one set and we can promise a treat in store for you. An excellent new 2CD compilation…offers the listener a deep dive into the legacy of a historically significant artist, meriting attention from anyone who can appreciate an organic fusion of blues, soul, a bit of doo-wop and prototypical rock…Bobby Parker’s timeless recordings still pulsate with personality, righteous energy, superb musicianship and soulful flair. If you don’t already know that fact firsthand, Soul Of The Blues is here to enlighten and entertain. Roger Wood Living Blues This is how all compilations should be done Dave Penny Blues & Rhythm This two-CD set – the first-ever compilation that focuses solely on his music – should change that. One listen, and you’ll be wondering why he flew under the radar for so long… Run, don’t walk, to buy this one. Bobby Parker was a treasure. This one’s going on my short list for historical album of the year, and, once you hear it, you’ll probably feel the same way, too. Marty Gunther Blues Blast Magazine (R&B Records) should be congratulated on putting together a comprehensive collection of hard to find material John Mitchell Blues In Britain All in all the 52 tracks here are a veritable treasure trove of wonderful music. And the presentation of the CD set is superb with a sumptuous booklet…I can’t recommend (it) strongly enough…The definitive Bobby Parker is a dream come true for fans like me – this is the best reissue CD of 2020 for sure. Don’t you dare miss it! John Ridley RANDB060
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    Beatles Beginnings Volume Two: Quarrymen – Rocknroll Volume One: Quarrymen - Skiffle - Country - Western
    Jazz; rock’n’roll; blues; music hall; guitar instrumentals; tin pan alley; rockabilly; dance band; soul; bolero; skiffle; trad; R&B; country; old-time; Broadway; doo-wop; folk; high school pop; Motown – the Beatles’ early influences are so wide-ranging that the Beatles Beginnings series of discs could quite easily pass for an introduction to the history of twentieth century popular music. The first disc in the series Quarrymen One investigates skiffle and the other music that the individual members of the group grew up listening to before rock’n’roll burst on to the scene. The Beatles established a repertoire of over 600 tunes, allowing them to tailor their set to the occasion for jazz clubs, strip clubs, folk clubs, working men’s clubs, church dances and rock’n’roll joints. Almost all of the songs they learned were released in the UK and from 1957 onwards, they avidly followed the weekly music charts and kept up to date with the records that did not make the hit parade. Before naming the Beatles in the summer of 1960, they were the Quarrymen. Quarrymen Two looks at the band’s rock’n’roll influences. For the first six years of their career, the Beatles were essentially a covers band. When they were captured live on tape in two sets at the Star Club in Hamburg in December 1962, they played thirty-two songs, only two of which were their own compositions. Going into 1961, Silver Beatles sees the group broadening out their repertoire to include some of the Latin-influenced ‘uptown R&B’ numbers currently in vogue, along with more rock’n’roll, rockabilly and some gospel-style numbers. This is an excellent compilation of songs…if you have volumes one and two and enjoyed them, this one is even better. Ernie Sutton British Beatles Fan Club Magazine By 1963, they had established an impressive repertoire of over 600 songs; their enthusiasm for popular music of all genres enabled them to play to a wide range of audiences, but in 1961-1962 they were mainly performing at the famous Cavern Club, when they were broadening out to include Latin-influenced songs, uptown R&B and dance craze numbers along with more rock’n’roll, rockabilly and easy listening items. The 5th CD covers the period between Ringo Starr joining the group and the start of Beatlemania in early 1963. It brings together pop, R&B and early soul records that the Beatles had in their live set in 1962. Star Club gives us an accurate picture of what they would have sounded like if we’d been there at the time. Late ‘62 through to mid ‘63, the Beatles’ live set and their recordings consisted mainly of cover versions of contemporary black American pop. A set list from a ten-song show in April ‘63 contained only four of their own songs. Yet by the end of the year, the Fab Four were making history with their own songs. CD 6 contains a mixture of songs taken from their 1963 live set and songs they recorded same year, along with other music that influenced their own compositions at this crucial time. A must for Beatles devotees and for any fan of early sixties pop interested in finding out more about what inspired the group and what shaped their musical sensibility. Alerting all Beatles fans! In fact, alerting anyone with even just a passing interest in music of Twentieth century popular music, for here’s a terrific series of albums they may well want to check out… superbly researched booklets, each volume will delve into the music that inspired, influenced and shaped the Beatles individually and collectively…here’s the very stuff that changed the world and forged the greatest band of all time. As the music rings out … you can almost hear the Beatles metamorphosing inside your ears as they listened, learned and immersed themselves, letting these songs open doors and fire their imagination: there was to be no looking back – an absolute gas. Colin Hall (curator of John Lennon’s house Mendips) The “Beginnings”series strikes again with another spectacular collection of original recordings that in this case inspired or influenced The Beatles… the accompanying booklet has extremely thorough and welcome annotation. I applaud whomever performed the extensive research that resulted in these fascinating choices. Their other series, “How Britain Got the Blues”, is every bit as good (if not better, as each set of this 4-part series is a 2-CD extravaganza of great cuts). Bravo to History of RnB Records for these releases and the outstanding music scholarship that accompanies them. William Stout Available as slimline CD set with annotated 48 page book. Each individual CD has 4 page insert. Produced as CD-R (professionally manufactured recordable CD printed for short run) All CDs are guaranteed error free and will always be replaced if any problems are encountered. Please advise if you require the printed inlays that can be inserted into CD jewel cases.
  • (shipped with booklet & CD inlays but without jewel case for cheaper airmail and less problems with EU customs)

    36 Page illustrated booklet.

    By the beginning of 1963, African-American music in New Orleans was in flux. Its happy-go-lucky R & B sound was no longer guaranteed to hit the national charts. In short, the good times in the city had run out of steam. The major issue now was what sort of music to record in the wake of the “British Invasion”. The answer of course was “soul”. Until soul became the ubiquitous African-American musical style, the music that was recorded in the city was a Louisiana gumbo of blues, R & B, gospel, swamp pop, anything and everything that might sell a few records.

    This set of CDs is the story of how one city, New Orleans, with its unique, proud and energetic history came to adopt soul music and how its music producers and arrangers came to utilise the styles of soul music being made in other cities of the US and to adapt them to the rhythms and approaches that made New Orleans so different to every other soul city USA.

    These CDs are also a tribute to the little labels, whose sound became the heartbeat of the city, playing out onto the streets from jukeboxes, radio stations and mom-and-pop stores selling a few 45s as a sideline. Most of the tracks on these CDs have never been released since the day that the vinyl was first stamped. This is New Orleans African-American music at its most potent. The sound of the young of the city as they heard it and played it two generations ago. RANDB052 You could drop the coin on any disc at random hear something hot. Fred Rothwell Blues & Rhythm With this latest History Of Soul release, New Orleans music fans should be in seventh heaven. David Cole Soul Basement (shipped with booklet and CD inlays but without jewel case to cut down on foreign postage)
  • Out of stock
    (shipped with booklet & CD inlays but without jewel case for cheaper postage and less problems with EU customs) See tracklisting for (RANDB037, RANDB045 PLUS RANDB054)
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    Includes fully illustrated booklet. ‘You might think that when you’ve been around for a long time and love music as much as we all do at Blues Matters, that we might become a little blasé receiving CDs to review. You’d be wrong...This is a staggering project, a sheer delight...You can stick a pin in anywhere and come up with a gem of a recording. What these records will present to even the most avid R&B aficionado is a revelation... lifting the lid on a buried treasure chest of arcane recordings, all in a style decades ahead of their time... Every one of these tracks is utterly satisfying. If you’re a true R&B fan, you will not experience a finer collection this year or any other. Exhilarating, educational, historical, but above all, extremely musical, a complete evening’s unforgettable R&B entertainment...Think you know your blues history? Think again. As this has taught me, you’re never too old to learn.’ ROY BAINTON Blues Matters RANDB023
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    Includes fully illustrated booklet. When many of these records were cut I was 4 years old and playing in the rubble of a bombed-out Hull, courtesy of the Luftwaffe. Back then, in the UK, any one of these 111 (yes, 111 even!) tracks would have given the BBC a coronary thrombosis because the nearest we got to black music was the bellowing burnt cork of Al Jolson. Following the previous R&B Anthology sets from R&B Records, I knew I’d be in for more thrills with this and I’m not disappointed, yet restricted wordage here precludes a full ecstatic overview. However - if you thought big strident in-your-face electric guitar chords arrived in the 1960s, check out 1947’s Midnight in The Barrel House by Johnny Otis. And there’s Dizzy Gillespie, Mahalia Jackson and even Hank Williams and Merle Travis. Needing wild, wanton and utterly danceable? You need Fluffy Hunter and Buddy Banks with the manic piano of Fluffy’s Debut. Disc 2 is replete with rare gems too. The sorely neglected Andrew Tibbs pre-empting Jerry Lee Lewis’s Wine Spodey-Odey by over a decade with the rousing Drinking Ink Splink. This is a magical mystery tour with Madam Ira Mae Littlejohn’s boisterous Go Devil Go and even a 1947 Muddy Waters with Gypsy Woman, contrasting nicely with the raucous front porch fiddling of Harry Choates and his Hackberry Hop. By the time you reach disc 3 you feel like you’ve drunk a half bottle of Bourbon. Amos Milburn kicks in with a rolling Chicken Shack Boogie, the sinister, dark and energetic 1948 cut of Hooker’s Boogie Chillen, Nellie Lutcher’s uplifting Fine Brown Frame and the honking saxes of The Twister by Paul Williams, the scintillating acapella harmonies of the Swan Silvertone Singers. Disc 4 boogies along just as agreeably with The Beale Street Gang’s Fat Stuff Boogie, followed by Arthur Smith’s seminal guitar hit, Guitar Boogie, there’s more 1948 Muddy Waters, a bouncy Pettin’ and Pokin’ by Louis Jordan and 20 other delights. This hefty collection curated by Nick Duckett, who also provides the entertaining liner notes, feels like stumbling into a sealed cave of musical pirate treasure; golden nuggets, jewelled crowns, dancing diamonds and rhythmic rubies. Sometimes musical history can jolt you from the terror and torpor of the present and take you to a long forgotten place of joy. That may sound like Pseud’s Corner, but these R&B Anthologies do it for me. Try it - you’ll be well rewarded. ROY BAINTON RANDB024