CDs

  • 1957-1963

    As Southern Soul reached its Golden Age around 1965-65, it was mining a rich seam of music that went back to blues gospel and country. In our third look at the music that went into Southern Soul, we have unearthed a shining array of rare gems from both male and female singers, who scream, cry and shout out their emotions. This elemental feel to the collection goes hand in hand with stunning arrangements and musicianship that will bring joy to anyone’s heart.

    Soul 002 & 017 Where Southern Soul Began 1 & 2 'These two 2-cd volumes are a fine way to trace the roots of what we now call 'southern soul', beginning back in 1954 through to 1962,.I immediately want to deliver a 'star pick' rating to the first volume., ultimately, its clear that the two sets are highly complimentary, excellently presented and really should be sitting together on the record shelves.' STAR PICK***** x2. Bob Cole Basement Group Review

    'Listening to the impressive tracks on these 2 CDs, and reading through the full colour 28 page booklet that accompanies it, these influences are mostly easy to identify and associate with. The overall standard of these 54 tracks is amazingly high and there are hours of fun to be had here, in the unlikely event that you ever tire of this collection, there is always the rest of the series to catch up with!' Red Lick Records

    Designed by connoisseurs for connoisseurs, these amazing collections of rare sides have notes written by John Ridley, that great treasure hunter of soul music. Once you’re on the train it moves at breakneck speed. Houston, Nashville, New Orleans, Memphis, Chicago, the stations parade by, never stopping more than three minutes on the same artist, the time it takes to listen to one side of a 45. Some well-known faces sit alongside a genuine crowd of forgotten heroes of soul and rhythm and blues. Perfectly delightful and surprisingly varied. Julien Cure – Soul Bag (France) SOUL022
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    1955-1962

    The music that led to southern soul is just too good to cram into one volume, so Part 2 of Where Southern Soul Began, showcases many more artists who contributed to the birth of the genre. The songs come from all parts of the south of the US: from New Orleans via Miami and from Mobile, Alabama to Memphis and Nashville. Many of these then unsung heroes such as Ted Taylor, Joe Tex, Otis Redding and William Bell, went on to have highly successful careers, and this set gives a valuable insight into the music they were making before the big hits started coming. Other artists featured are more obscure as they made only a few recordings before fading from view. Yet singers such as Steve Dixon, George Hughley and Prince Conley made just as valid a contribution to the beginnings of southern soul.

    The music here inspired the giants of black American music in the sixties. It combines elements of country, R & B, doo-wop, gospel and blues, and retains the ability to move listeners some 50 years on with its emotional intensity and musical power.

    Soul 002 & 017 Where Southern Soul Began 1 & 2 'These two 2-cd volumes are a fine way to trace the roots of what we now call 'southern soul', beginning back in 1954 through to 1962,.I immediately want to deliver a 'star pick' rating to the first volume., ultimately, its clear that the two sets are highly complimentary, excellently presented and really should be sitting together on the record shelves.' STAR PICK***** x2. Bob Cole Basement Group Review

    SOUL017
  • Out of stock

    1954-1962 The Golden Age of southern soul lasted from about 1964 to 1975, when disco ripped the heart out of it. Although it may seem as if the blend of country, gospel and R & B that emerged from the great studios in Memphis and Muscle Shoals in that decade was entirely new, like any other genre, southern soul absorbed influences from a whole variety of sources. Part of the 'History of Soul' series, these CDs reveal the musical antecedents that gave southern soul its inspiration. A good few of the artists here, represented in their early attempts at creating an individual style, went on to become some of the biggest stars of the '60s. Others, perhaps less famously, provided ideas and techniques that became stylistic standards. If you ever wondered what musical forms anticipated the southern soul explosion, the answer is in these tracks. If you thought that secularised gospel started with Sam Cooke and Ray Charles, think again as you listen to vocalists who pioneered this many years before them. And if you imagined that the producers at Royal Studios, or Fame or Cosimo's in New Orleans invented something completely unprecedented, you were missing something. The accompanying booklet is written by John Ridley. The music here will tell you the real story – and it will knock your socks off too!

    'Listening to the impressive tracks on these 2 CDs, and reading through the full colour 28 page booklet that accompanies it, these influences are mostly easy to identify and associate with. The overall standard of these 54 tracks is amazingly high and there are hours of fun to be had here, in the unlikely event that you ever tire of this collection, there is always the rest of the series to catch up with!' Red Lick Records

    Soul 002 & 017 Where Southern Soul Began 1 & 2 'These two 2-cd volumes are a fine way to trace the roots of what we now call 'southern soul', beginning back in 1954 through to 1962,.I immediately want to deliver a 'star pick' rating to the first volume., ultimately, its clear that the two sets are highly complimentary, excellently presented and really should be sitting together on the record shelves.' STAR PICK***** x2. Bob Cole Basement Group Review

    SOUL002
  • Part of the 'History of Soul' series but a pleasure in its own right, this CD bears witness to the creation of a distinctive, smooth soul sound made in Chicago in the early 1960s that we associate with such legendary figures as Curtis Mayfield, Betty Everett and McKinley Mitchell. Black music was transitioning between R&B and soul at this time, and vocal groups were introducing a new gospel sensibility into their songs.

    The accompanying booklet is written by Robert Pruter, author of the acclaimed 'Chicago Soul'.

    'Contains some absolutely stunning tracks and I applaud the compilers for their selection. To add icing on the cake, the booklet is in the Ace/Kent league when it comes to sheer size and quality written by no other than Robert Pruter.' Keith Rylatt – Manifesto Soul Magazine

    This fine collection brings together the cream of Windy City soul from the years 1950 to 1962. As is often the case with these types of compilations, it's the obscure cuts that make them worthwhile and this one is no exception. Roots & Rhythm

    SOUL001
  • Out of stock

    Rhythm & Blues Records presents a new series of double CDs highlighting the 240 or so songs most frequently performed by British beat and blues artists. Volume One spotlights the pre-Beatles skiffle and folk era and ties this in to the Blues Boom group material of the late 1960s. Three further volumes concentrate on Merseybeat, the London scene and the jazz and soul sounds that influenced the mod movement. In the late 1960s, when US college youth were likely to buy anything British labelled ‘heavy', ‘progressive' or  ‘blues', the brand-leaders of the British Invasion: The Rolling Stones, Fleetwood Mac, Cream, Ten Years After, The Jeff Beck Group and Led Zeppelin were, without exception, born out of the American music included in this fascinating collection.

    Teenagers in post-war America weren't particularly fond of folk, blues or country and western; that was the stuff that their parents liked. Yet to some of their counterparts in ration-book Britain, this music seemed to offer messages from an intriguing culture half a world away. Lonnie Donegan's hit album 'King of Skiffle' engendered a craze among British teenagers for reproducing and even recording these sounds in their suburban bedrooms or provincial youth clubs, on cheap guitars and homemade instruments. The skiffle sound spread like wildfire across the UK before its more discerning practitioners reverted, towards a more rock 'n' roll style, taking their fusion back to North America whence it had come, in a 'British Invasion'.

    R014

  • Out of stock

    Rhythm & Blues Records presents a new series of double CDs highlighting the 240 or so songs most frequently performed by British beat and blues artists. Volume One spotlights the pre-Beatles skiffle and folk era and ties this in to the Blues Boom group material of the late 1960s. Three further volumes concentrate on Merseybeat, the London scene and the jazz and soul sounds that influenced the mod movement. In the late 1960s, when US college youth were likely to buy anything British labelled ‘heavy', ‘progressive' or  ‘blues', the brand-leaders of the British Invasion: The Rolling Stones, Fleetwood Mac, Cream, Ten Years After, The Jeff Beck Group and Led Zeppelin were, without exception, born out of the American music included in this fascinating collection.

    Teenagers in post-war America weren't particularly fond of folk, blues or country and western; that was the stuff that their parents liked. Yet to some of their counterparts in ration-book Britain, this music seemed to offer messages from an intriguing culture half a world away. Lonnie Donegan's hit album 'King of Skiffle' engendered a craze among British teenagers for reproducing and even recording these sounds in their suburban bedrooms or provincial youth clubs, on cheap guitars and homemade instruments. The skiffle sound spread like wildfire across the UK before its more discerning practitioners reverted, towards a more rock 'n' roll style, taking their fusion back to North America whence it had come, in a 'British Invasion'.

    R013

  • Out of stock

    Rhythm & Blues Records presents a new series of double CDs highlighting the 240 or so songs most frequently performed by British beat and blues artists. Volume One spotlights the pre-Beatles skiffle and folk era and ties this in to the Blues Boom group material of the late 1960s. Three further volumes concentrate on Merseybeat, the London scene and the jazz and soul sounds that influenced the mod movement. In the late 1960s, when US college youth were likely to buy anything British labelled ‘heavy', ‘progressive' or  ‘blues', the brand-leaders of the British Invasion: The Rolling Stones, Fleetwood Mac, Cream, Ten Years After, The Jeff Beck Group and Led Zeppelin were, without exception, born out of the American music included in this fascinating collection.

    Teenagers in post-war America weren't particularly fond of folk, blues or country and western; that was the stuff that their parents liked. Yet to some of their counterparts in ration-book Britain, this music seemed to offer messages from an intriguing culture half a world away. Lonnie Donegan's hit album 'King of Skiffle' engendered a craze among British teenagers for reproducing and even recording these sounds in their suburban bedrooms or provincial youth clubs, on cheap guitars and homemade instruments. The skiffle sound spread like wildfire across the UK before its more discerning practitioners reverted, towards a more rock 'n' roll style, taking their fusion back to North America whence it had come, in a 'British Invasion'.

    R006

  • Out of stock

    Rhythm & Blues Records presents a new series of double CDs highlighting the 240 or so songs most frequently performed by British beat and blues artists. Volume One spotlights the pre-Beatles skiffle and folk era and ties this in to the Blues Boom group material of the late 1960s. Three further volumes concentrate on Merseybeat, the London scene and the jazz and soul sounds that influenced the mod movement. In the late 1960s, when US college youth were likely to buy anything British labelled ‘heavy', ‘progressive' or  ‘blues', the brand-leaders of the British Invasion: The Rolling Stones, Fleetwood Mac, Cream, Ten Years After, The Jeff Beck Group and Led Zeppelin were, without exception, born out of the American music included in this fascinating collection.

    Teenagers in post-war America weren't particularly fond of folk, blues or country and western; that was the stuff that their parents liked. Yet to some of their counterparts in ration-book Britain, this music seemed to offer messages from an intriguing culture half a world away. Lonnie Donegan's hit album 'King of Skiffle' engendered a craze among British teenagers for reproducing and even recording these sounds in their suburban bedrooms or provincial youth clubs, on cheap guitars and homemade instruments. The skiffle sound spread like wildfire across the UK before its more discerning practitioners reverted, towards a more rock 'n' roll style, taking their fusion back to North America whence it had come, in a 'British Invasion'.

    R005

  • Out of stock

    Rhythm & Blues Records presents a new series of double CDs highlighting the 240 or so songs most frequently performed by British beat and blues artists. Volume One spotlights the pre-Beatles skiffle and folk era and ties this in to the Blues Boom group material of the late 1960s. Three further volumes concentrate on Merseybeat, the London scene and the jazz and soul sounds that influenced the mod movement. In the late 1960s, when US college youth were likely to buy anything British labelled ‘heavy', ‘progressive' or  ‘blues', the brand-leaders of the British Invasion: The Rolling Stones, Fleetwood Mac, Cream, Ten Years After, The Jeff Beck Group and Led Zeppelin were, without exception, born out of the American music included in this fascinating collection.

    Teenagers in post-war America weren't particularly fond of folk, blues or country and western; that was the stuff that their parents liked. Yet to some of their counterparts in ration-book Britain, this music seemed to offer messages from an intriguing culture half a world away. Lonnie Donegan's hit album 'King of Skiffle' engendered a craze among British teenagers for reproducing and even recording these sounds in their suburban bedrooms or provincial youth clubs, on cheap guitars and homemade instruments. The skiffle sound spread like wildfire across the UK before its more discerning practitioners reverted, towards a more rock 'n' roll style, taking their fusion back to North America whence it had come, in a 'British Invasion'.

    R016

  • Manchester Free Trade Hall was host to two concerts on Sunday October 21st 1962 that acted as a catalyst to the nascent British Blues & R&B boom, on the verge of breaking out of its suburban home in Ealing, West London. The shows were promoted by Stockport-based Paddy MacKiernan under the Jazz Unlimited banner and attracted a crowd of around two thousand enthusiasts, who saw the first major concert in Britain to feature American bluesmen. Manchester was the only UK date on the 1962 American Folk-Blues Festival tour and it was attended by blues fans from all over the country through what Paul Jones called ‘the bush telegraph’. With Jones were Alexis Korner and Macclesfield-born John Mayall, plus extraordinarily a contingent of younger fans who had made the trip in a clapped out van from London. Why extraordinary? Because the van contained some of the future superstars of the British scene: Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Brian Jones and Jimmy Page. The Stones by this time had just a dozen gigs under their belts and Page had recently embarked on the first stage of his career as a session guitarist. David Williams dedicates a whole chapter to the road trip in his book The First Time We Met The Blues. “It must have been around early September 1962 when news filtered down the grapevine…We could hardly believe that real blues artists were going to appear here in our country…were regarded somewhat like mystic gods within our circle…(Jimmy Page) realised that he would not be able to make the journey with us as he was already booked to play a gig with Neil Christian on the Saturday night…it was agreed Jim would travel up by train on the Sunday and we would find space for him in the van for the journey back overnight…Graham (Ackers) was a pretty good driver and soon managed to find his way through Central London to a square ...where we picked up Mick, Keith and Brian.” Keith Richards remembers it differently, “Mick sometimes had the use of his parents’ Triumph Herald at the weekend and I remember we went to see a big blues show in Manchester.” Jimmy Page: “When David Williams told me of the impending visit of the initial American Folk-Blues Festival to England, I was keen to join the pilgrimage to Manchester. It was not only the first time that I would actually see artists like John Lee Hooker and T-Bone Walker perform, but it was also the first time I met Mick Jagger, Brian Jones and Keith Richards, who came with us on the trip. We were all like-minded enthusiasts and in those days we regarded the artists we were going to see as idols.” ABC TV filmed the second show and broadcast it in two parts for its Tempo programme. The recordings (from the Newby collection) are of excellent sound quality and were taken off air by direct line into a Tandberg reel to reel recorder. RANDB059
  • Out of stock
    Two CDs analysing the songs and styles that inspired the Rolling Stones with two fully illustrated 24-page booklets. CD1 covers 1962-1964, documenting how Little Blue Boy and the Blue Boys became first the Rollin’ Stones and then the Rolling Stones we know and love today. The journey takes us from reel-to-reel recordings in suburban front rooms via primitive London studios with egg-box soundproofing to the legendary Chess studios in Chicago. On CD 2, we focus on the seminal years 1962- 1965 as the Stones evolved from duplicating the music made by their American idols and start to give it their own distinctive treatment. Even after fifty years these 27 tracks tells us a lot about the musical DNA of the Rolling Stones. Dig in! This compilation set highlights the cover versions responsible for shaping the Stones sound, then and now. RANDB056
  • Out of stock
    We know that the Stones built their early career on songs originally performed by The Holy Trinity - Chuck Berry, Bo Diddley and Jimmy Reed. But did you know that the Stones also performed songs made famous by Elvis Presley, Ritchie Valens and the Shadows? It’s all here – fully documented and sounding terrific. We focus on the seminal years 1962- 1965 as the Stones evolved from duplicating the music made by their American idols and start to give it their own distinctive treatment. Even after fifty years these 27 tracks tells us a lot about the musical DNA of the Rolling Stones. Dig in! A series of CDs analysing the songs and styles that inspired the Rolling Stones with fully illustrated 24-page booklet. R007
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    Pete Townshend might have been the most articulate songwriter of his generation but like every other band of their era , The Who cut their teeth on cover versions which influenced how their sound developed. From their first gigs The Who were open to a wide range of influences including rhythm and blues, soul, country, jazz, surf, rock ’n’ roll and classical. And it’s all here, in great sound and with a full explanation of what every track meant to The Who. At least three of the cover versions in this collection subsequently mutated into “originals” - see if you can spot them! This CD analyses the songs and styles that inspired The Who and includes a fully illustrated 24-page booklet. R009
  • Out of stock
    For too long the Stones covers CD has been the province of freebie magazine cover-mounts and shoddy garage cheapies. No more. Because Rhythm And Blues Records are Doing It Right. Following on from their well-received compilations covering the roots of rock’n’roll the R And B team shine a spotlight on the songs that shaped the Rolling Stones. Volume One covers 1962-1964, documenting how Little Blue Boy and the Blue Boys became first the Rollin’ Stones and then the Rolling Stones we know and love today. The journey takes us from reel-to-reel recordings in suburban front rooms via primitive London studios with egg-box soundproofing to the legendary Chess studios in Chicago. This compilation highlights the cover versions responsible for shaping the Stones sound, then and now. Over twenty-five songs this CD features seminal artists such as Chuck Berry, Muddy Waters, Jimmy Reed, Bo Diddley, Slim Harpo and Big Bill Broonzy as well as the lesser known Tampa Red, Will Bradley and Jazz Gillum. All tracks have been carefully remastered to optimise the sound. An extensively illustrated 28 page booklet features detailed sleevenotes from compilers Nick Duckett and Simon Wright, including a track-by-track commentary and an essay explaining the significance of each song to the Rolling Stones. This is taken from the Introduction: 'The Stones started off as skinny white boys playing music written mostly by old black men. Forty-seven years later, covers are still essential to the Stones, both live and on record - even on the last few tours covers have been played respectfully, partly as public recognition of the bands roots but also because the Stones still enjoy playing the songs they grew up with. The Stones play classic R’n’B with an authority and rhythmic drive no other band has ever consistently matched - in Keith Richard's words they have both the rock and the roll. In recent years the Stones have even featured guests such as John Lee Hooker and Buddy Guy on high profile live dates. Here is a band that pays its dues.' RANDB005
  • The Kinks emerged from the musical activities of brothers Ray and Dave Davies, born three years apart and raised in Muswell Hill, London. Their first musical incarnation was the Ray Davies Quartet, formed around 1960 with schoolmate Pete Quaife, and this line up, with various drummers, performed blues, folk and jazz at pubs and coffee houses mainly in the north London area. Guitar instrumentals, R&B and rock’n’roll songs were added to the set list as the band went through frequent name changes. This CD is a collection of the songs that were most influential on the sound of the early Kinks and is representative of the live repertoire of the band from the time immediately prior to their signing a recording contract with Pye Records in January 1964. The illustrated 24-page booklet includes essays by Doug Hinman and Nick Duckett and explains the relevance of each track to The Kinks. R008
  • da DAH DAH da DAH da DAH DAH da DAH Possibly the most exciting riff in rock history; raw, dirty and totally infectious. You Really Got Me was a landmark recording: a breakthrough in sound that has echoed throughdozens of rock classics and become the blueprint for hard rock, heavy metal even, while its sloppy guitar solo pointed the way for punk rock. No rock band is an island. The Kinks started writing at one of the most exciting times in popular music, when youngsters were hungry for new and obscure discs, mixing it up, learning all the time, trying it out in their front rooms. Here is the story of You Really Got Me. CD One tells the story of this seminal record and charts its influences, some of them surprising. CD Two presents original versions of Kinks stage favourites. RANDB033
  • CD1 KINKS BEGINNINGS 1 CD2 STORY OF A SONG CD3 KINKS BEGINNINGS 2 ‘I advise you to listen with the liner notes handy' Doug Hinman This CD set presents on two discs, the songs that were most influential on the sound of the early Kinks and also the original versions of those songs the group have played in concert over the years. The additional disc focuses on recordings which influenced the creation of You Really Got Me. 32-page booklet explaining the relevance of each track to The Kinks. RANDB046
  • Out of stock
    In 1965, there were two types of group in the UK: those influenced strongly by the Beatles, and those whose raison d'être was American blues and R&B. In part this split would have come about because of the pioneering blues work from Alexis Korner and Cyril Davies, who were both London based. Newcastle’s Animals and Belfast’s Them were the two biggest exceptions. Among the highlights of this CD set are the Animals’ contributions to a Granada TV show “Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On”. Check out the clip on the net - the camera sweeps across and Eric kicks into the a cappella intro to “Talkin’ ‘Bout You” supported only by hand clapping; there’s a flourish from Alan Price’s Vox and they’re off. Elsewhere the boys conjure up images of people like Pinetop Perkins via Ray Charles’ early classic “Mess Around”; they give us their take on the much recorded “See See Rider” which doesn’t owe a debt to anyone; and they deliver a swinging ”I Got To Find My Baby” with plenty of ad hoc extras from Eric. Several of those great hit singles (plus a flip plus some LP tracks) are here too, all benefitting from full “road testing”; Hooker’s “Boom Boom” is a stand -out with mood switching between intimacy and all out rocking. Round about the time the Animals‘ first single was released, I saw the band perform in one of those Central London clubs you have to go downstairs to reach. They were the toughest of the British R&B Groups. They were the real thing. Dave Stephens RANDB057 Produced as CD-R (professionally manufactured recordable CD printed for short run) as opposed to CD-P (professionally manufactured pressed CDs made in quantities of 500+). All CDs whether CD-R or CD-P are 100% guaranteed error free. Discs will always be replaced if any problems are encountered. 24-page booklet included
  • New Orleans.... home of jazz, birthplace of the funk and, some would say, of rock'n'roll. No great controversy there, but The Big Easy's role in the history of soul music has been less well documented. Part of the 'History of Soul' series, this compilation of tracks illustrates the depth and breadth of music produced in the city between 1958 and 1962. Music that went way beyond R&B, taking into soul the joyous rhythms of funky second line parade bands, the gospel-based piano triplets of barrelhouse wizards and the tight horn sections of Allen Toussaint and Dave Bartholomew, whose arrangements from would later inform the classic Stax sound. The familiar names are all here: Irma Thomas, Aaron Neville, Eddie Bo, Bobby Marchan but so are the lesser known but fabulous Ray Washington, Berna Dean, Martha Carter and Chuck Carbo. So prepare to be blown away by some of the most exciting, deep and affecting sounds that ever came from Louisiana and made their way into soul as we know it. 'This is an amazing value for the price - SO MANY good songs from some of the best classic New Orleans music artists. I stumbled across this gem looking for Ernie K-Doe and discovered so many amazing hits via this compilation!' Miss Malaprop (New Orleans blogger) SOUL003
  • More than any other city in the world, New Orleans has been responsible for shaping the sound of twentieth century popular music. Sweeping statement that may be, but as the birthplace of jazz, funk and arguably rock’n’roll, it really has no other contenders. At the heart of these three widely different varieties of music lies the rhythmic complexity of second line parade drumming. Its two-beat patterns combining military band and Caribbean rhythms underpin the early recordings of Louis Armstrong as much as they do those of Little Richard and James Brown. This compilation highlights some of the distinguishing characteristics found in early New Orleans recordings, not with the intention of picking out the city’s finest jazz and blues recordings but in order to pinpoint styles that would foreshadow later developments in the rhythm and blues field. 28 page booklet RANDB029 Produced as CD-R (professionally manufactured recordable CD printed for short run) as opposed to CD-P (professionally manufactured pressed CDs made in quantities of 500+). All CDs whether CD-R or CD-P are 100% guaranteed error free. Discs will always be replaced if any problems are encountered.
  • More than any other city in the world, New Orleans has been responsible for shaping the sound of twentieth century popular music. Sweeping statement that may be, but as the birthplace of jazz, funk and arguably rock’n’roll, it really has no other contenders. At the heart of these three widely different varieties of music lies the rhythmic complexity of second line parade drumming. Its two-beat patterns combining military band and Caribbean rhythms underpin the early recordings of Louis Armstrong as much as they do those of Little Richard and James Brown. This compilation highlights some of the distinguishing characteristics found in early New Orleans recordings, not with the intention of picking out the city’s finest jazz and blues recordings but in order to pinpoint styles that would foreshadow later developments in the rhythm and blues field. 12 page booklet RANDB014 Produced as CD-R (professionally manufactured recordable CD printed for short run) as opposed to CD-P (professionally manufactured pressed CDs made in quantities of 500+). All CDs whether CD-R or CD-P are 100% guaranteed error free. Discs will always be replaced if any problems are encountered.
  • More than any other city in the world, New Orleans has been responsible for shaping the sound of twentieth century popular music. Sweeping statement that may be, but as the birthplace of jazz, funk and arguably rock’n’roll, it really has no other contenders. At the heart of these three widely different varieties of music lies the rhythmic complexity of second line parade drumming. Its two-beat patterns combining military band and Caribbean rhythms underpin the early recordings of Louis Armstrong as much as they do those of Little Richard and James Brown. This compilation highlights some of the distinguishing characteristics found in early New Orleans recordings, not with the intention of picking out the city’s finest jazz and blues recordings but in order to pinpoint styles that would foreshadow later developments in the rhythm and blues field. 28 page booklet RANDB013 Produced as CD-R (professionally manufactured recordable CD printed for short run) as opposed to CD-P (professionally manufactured pressed CDs made in quantities of 500+). All CDs whether CD-R or CD-P are 100% guaranteed error free. Discs will always be replaced if any problems are encountered. 12 page booklet
  • Out of stock
    FROM ROCK'N'ROLL TO THE END OF THE CARNIVAL More than any other city in the world, New Orleans has been responsible for shaping the sound of twentieth century popular music. Sweeping statement that may be, but as the birthplace of jazz, funk and arguably rock’n’roll, it really has no other contenders. At the heart of these three widely different varieties of music lies the rhythmic complexity of second line parade drumming. Its two-beat patterns combining military band and Caribbean rhythms underpin the early recordings of Louis Armstrong as much as they do those of Little Richard and James Brown. Discs One & Two of this set cover the classic period the New Orleans r&b and rock’n’roll and feature records which most people would now identify as quintessentially New Orleans. On discs Three & Four, we find the music on the cusp between the end of the rock’n’roll era and the birth of soul music. The tracks on discs Five and Six reflects the final move towards more soulful productions and present the best music produced in the city before the entire scene finally scattered and the musicians dispersed in 1963-64. After spending the last couple of months basking in the aural joy of this label's Rhythm & Blues Chronology series covering the 1940s, I've reached the conclusion that anything which comes off the Rhythm and Blues Records production line is bound for 'top of the stack' status. This exquisitely packaged 6 CD set, presented in a handy hard-back book format, pushes every button a fan of Blues, R&B or Rock “n' Roll might have. Here's 160 - yes, 160(!) tracks starting with Rip It Up by Little Richard in 1955 all the way to Huey 'Piano' Smith and his Clowns Talk To Me Baby in 1962. The journey from disk 1 to disk 6 is an education, made more so by Nick Duckett's 24 pages of comprehensive notes which forms the central section of the package. A fine collection like this will always remind us that, no matter how long you've been around and listening to R&B, there's still a helluva lot we've missed. Names which represent true rarity, often by long-vanished single record artists whose fine work may well have been buried by time but for the forensic research and digging by true aficionados like Mr. Duckett. There are some terrific items which have been hitherto unreleased, such as Leonard Carbo's I Don't Want To Lose Her, Larry Williams' Oh Baby, Tommy Ridgley's dynamic Real Gone Jam or the quirky Tell Me The Truth by the Turquinettes. In fact up to 50% of these records feature names a great many of us, R&B devotees or not, may well never have heard of, yet everything on this glorious hours-long listening spree will serve to remind us all that Chicago, New York, Memphis and L.A. may have been important spokes on the blues and rock wheel, but New Orleans was the hub. There is a unique, joyous bounce to the Louisiana sound. It emanates from the small, passion-packed studios which echoed to the rolling rhythms of Professor Longhair and the cheeky thrust of Fats Domino, both of whom feature here, as well as dozens of other luminaries such as Art Neville, Frankie Ford and TV Slim. If you can't afford the fare to New Orleans, then this is a highly economical alternative. I've been firing up my gumbo and stirring my jambalaya to these records. We could all do with a touch of Mardi Gras in our dour British winter - and these six platters will turn anyone's front room into North Rampart Street. I suppose by now youve reached the conclusion I like this. Damn right - highly recommended. ROY BAINTON RANDB032
  • Jazz; rock’n’roll; blues; music hall; guitar instrumentals; tin pan alley; rockabilly; dance band; soul; bolero; skiffle; trad; R&B; country; old-time; Broadway; doo-wop; folk; high school pop; Motown - the Beatles’ early influences are so wide-ranging that the Beatles Beginnings series of discs could quite easily pass for an introduction to the history of twentieth century popular music. Covering the period 1957-60, the first disc in the series Quarrymen One investigates skiffle and the other music that the individual members of the group grew up listening to before rock’n’roll burst on to the scene. Alerting all Beatles fans! In fact, alerting anyone with even just a passing interest in music of Twentieth century popular music, for here’s a terrific series of albums they may well want to check out... superbly researched booklets, each volume will delve into the music that inspired, influenced and shaped the Beatles individually and collectively...here’s the very stuff that changed the world and forged the greatest band of all time. As the music rings out ... you can almost hear the Beatles metamorphosing inside your ears as they listened, learned and immersed themselves, letting these songs open doors and fire their imagination: there was to be no looking back - an absolute gas. Colin Hall R2 Every baby-boomer whose life has been soundtracked by pop will be more than merely familiar with most of the items here, whether ‘Long Tall Sally', 'Roll Over Beethoven', 'Matchbox', 'Honey Don't' and 'Words Of Love', all revived on disc by The Beatles after they'd left the runway. Almost as potent a selling point is Nick Duckett's entertaining and informative thirty-page essay within a package that is as likely to engross the general cultural historian as much as fans of this particular act. Alan Clayson - The Beat RANDB004 Available as slimline CD with annotated 48 page book and has 4 page CD insert. Produced as CD-R (professionally manufactured recordable CD printed for short run) All CDs are guaranteed error free and will always be replaced if any problems are encountered. Please advise if you require printed inlays that can be inserted into CD jewel cases.