CDs

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    1. Sweet and Lovely
    2. Sweet Lotus Blossom
    3. You Are My Heart’s Delight
    Ronnie Scott (ts); Stan Tracey (p); Rick Laird (b); Ronnie Stephenson (d) BBC Jazz Club, London, February 8th 1965  
    1. Close Your Eyes
    2. Waltz for Debby*
    3. Music That Makes Me Dance/When She Makes Music*
    4. The Night Is Young
    5. I’ll Be Seeing You
    Ronnie Scott (ts); Stan Tracey (p); Freddy Logan (b); Bill Eyden (d); Mark Murphy (vocal*) BBC Jazz Club, London, April 17th 1966  
    1. Close Your Eyes
    2. What’s New?
    3. Avalon
    Ronnie Scott (ts); Stan Tracey (p); Malcolm Cecil (b); Jackie Dougan (d) Free Trade Hall, Manchester, June 6th 1964  
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    DISC ONE
    1. Edgar Hayes Fat Meat 'n' Greens
    2. Professor Longhair Tipitina
    3. Chris Powell Mambo Gunch
    4. Mose Allison The Seventh Son
    5. Ahmad Jamal Trio Poinciana
    6. Bill Doggett Hold It
    7. Ernie Freeman Live It Up
    8. Earl King Come On (Pts 1 & 2)
    9. Drits & Dravy Talk That Talk (Pt. 1)
    10. Ike & Tina Turner I Idolize You
    11. Jack McDuff Brother Jack
    12. James Brown And I Do Just What I Want
    13. Roy Montrell Mudd
    14. Sugar Pie DeSanto Can't Let You Go
    15. Al Robinson I'm Leaving You Today
    16. Earl King Trick Bag
    17. Eddie Bo Check Mr. Popeye
    18. The Isley Brothers Teach Me How To Shimmy
    19. Gino Parks Fire
    20. Joe 'Guitar' Morris The Git Back (Pt. 1)
    21. Prince La La She Put The Hurt On Me
    22. Stanley Turrentine Baia
    23. Fabulous Playboys Honkey Tonk Woman
    24. Vernon Harrel Slick Chick
    DISC TWO
    1. James Brown Mashed Potatoes U.S.A.
    2. Billy Stewart Fat Boy
    3. Jimmy Pace Stop My Heart From Crying
    4. Lee Dorsey People Gonna Talk
    5. Ernie K-Doe I Got To Find Somebody
    6. Marvin Gaye Hitch Hike
    7. Pistol Keep On Lovin' You
    8. Porgy & The Polka Dots Say Yeah
    9. Ray Johnson Soul City
    10. Shirley Raymond What a Wedding Day
    11. Fred Lowery Goodbye
    12. Spider Johnson Doin' The Popeye
    13. Huey 'Piano' Smith Talk To Me Baby
    14. Dolores Johnson What Kind Of Man Are You
    15. Turquinettes Tell Me The Truth
    16. Bob Bateman R B Special
    17. James Booker Big Nick
    18. Wallace Johnson Clap Your Hands
    19. Roosevelt Fountain Red Pepper (Pts 1 & 2)
    20. C. Davis Coolin' Out
    21. David Rockingham Trio Joy De Vie
    22. Bobby Mitchell You Got The Nerve
    23. James Brown I've Got Money
     
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    (shipped with booklet & CD inlays but without jewel case for cheaper airmail and less problems with EU customs) Just before the United States joined the Second World War, Jazz was at a crossroads. Big Band Swing was at the height of its popularity amongst white jazz fans, but black audiences were tiring of the bland, easy listening fare being served up by the likes of Glenn Miller. It was high time to put some excitement back into jazz, and the ‘honkers and screamers’ were in the right place at the right time to do it. Jazz purists hated it, but the public lapped it up. This set brings together all the jazz and R&B instrumentals that reached the R&B charts between 1942 and 1963 and draws a connecting line between Swing, Bebop, Boogie, Jive, Mambo, Rock’n’roll, culminating in the funky organ grooves of Booker T and Jimmy Smith. It still has the irresistible energy that seduced so many in the Forties, Fifties and Sixties and changed the character of popular music forever.   RANDB050 With its comprehensive, almost scholarly approach, this is a fantastic project – just what the instrumental collector/historian ordered. But it also makes for good entertainment as the sequencing of the tracks is adjusted for listening pleasure. Alan Taylor Pipeline The extensive notes include recording dates, composer, artist, original catalogue numbers and chart entry number/date. There are just so many great tunes here that at times you could be overwhelmed but you’ll be dancing and smiling so never mind. GRAEME SCOTT Blues Matters Here’s a killer compilation of swing, jazz, smoochers, mild/wild rockin’ jivers to fill any sax-loving fan with delight and every one a hit. Compiler Nick Duckett has combed the charts of Billboard, Cashbox R&B, even Pop to come up with the goods, from número uno to a humble #128. You should have no difficulty with most, if not all of the acts, tho some of the titles may be unfamiliar. With bulging booklet, amply illustrated…if you're a sax maniac, you're in hog heaven…more than well worth a listen. Tony Martin American Music Magazine/NDT
  • This set brings together the finest R&B instrumentals recorded between 1956 and 1957, putting the spotlight both on long-forgotten records by established artists and fabulous obscurities by long-forgotten ones! It’s a cracking compilation from start to finish: Mid-West electric blues, Southern swamp rock, spicy New Orleans rhythms, sophisticated West-Coast productions and East Coast city blues, dominated by guitarists and saxophonists but interspersed with a few organists, accordionists, pianists, harmonicists and even a unitarist. All in all, 120 mighty instrumental stompers from 1956-57, R&B-style. Glorious stuff! RANDB054 Produced as CD-R (professionally manufactured recordable CD printed for short run) as opposed to CD-P (professionally manufactured pressed CDs made in quantities of 500+). Comes with original printed CD inner plus annotated 28-page booklet All CDs whether CD-R or CD-P are 100% guaranteed error free. Discs will always be replaced if any problems are encountered.
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    Country blues and club blues; drinking songs and risqué songs; vocal groups and instrumental combos. From bebop to boogie, gutbucket to gospel, honkin’ and screamin’ to low down and dirty rock’n’roll; 112 tracks and not a dud in the bunch! RANDB078 5CD bonus disc 1. I'm A Night Owl Glenn Lowell Fulson Swing Time 243 1950 2. Birmingham Bounce Gunter Amos Milburn Aladdin 3058 1950 3. Bat-Lee Swing Allen George Miller’s Mid-Driffs Mercury 8183 Feb 1950 4. One Monkey Don't Stop The Show McGhee Sticks McGhee Atlantic 937 Nov 1950 5. I Know Ramson/Toombs Ruth Brown Atlantic 941 Oct 1950 6. Who Said Shorty Wasn't Coming Back Glover/Nix/Mundy Henry Glover King 4398 Feb 1950 7. Time Is Marching On Unknown The Ravens National 9148 1950 8. Cool Down Mama Hunter Lost John Hunter Four Star 1492 1950 9. Hillbilly Boogie Irby Jerry Irby MGM 10809 Mar 1950 10. Nobody's Lovin' Me Glover Lonnie Johnson King 4432 Sep 1950 11. Black Fantasy Glenn Lloyd Glenn Swing Time 336 Nov 1950 12. Rockin' Chair Mama Littlefield Little Willie Littlefield Modern 20-729 Feb 1950 13. I Found My Baby Hunter Ivory Joe Hunter MGM 10899 May 1950 14. Call On The Phone Campbell Lewis Campbell MGM 10787 1950 15. Chicken Blues Ward/Marks The Dominoes Federal 12001 Nov 1950 16. Empty Hand Peck/James/Wright Billy Wright Savoy 733 Jan 1950 17. I'll Never Be Free Weiss Dinah Washington Mercury 8187 May 1950 18. Earthquake The Singletons Charlie Singleton Red Robin 103 1950 19. Jumping Jacks Unknown The Three Riffs Apollo 1164 1950 20. Late In The Evening Blues Henry Ray Charles Swing Time 228 May 1950 21. Shuffle Shuck Valentine/Moore Jimmy Liggins Specialty 380 May 1950 22. This Old World Unknown Goldia Haynes/Joe Liggins Capitol 1019 Apr 1950 23. Hamburger Joint McCracklin Jimmy McCracklin Modern 1950 24. Later For The Gator Jackson Willis Jackson Apollo 806 1950 25. Love My Baby Joe Turner Joe Turner Imperial 5093 Apr 1950 26. Come On In King Porter King Porter King 4333 1950 27. Jumping This Morning Williams Tippo Lite & The All Stars Back Alley 202 1950 28. Frantic Chick Bartholomew Dave Bartholomew Imperial 5089 Mar 1950 29. Hey! La Bas Boogie Bartholomew/Domino Fats Domino Imperial 5085 Jan 1950
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    What you have on this 2CD set is a glimpse into Georgie Fame’s world circa 1964/65. It comprises 45 songs recorded for the BBC and others between 1964 and 1965 (mostly in excellent quality sound), including two exciting live audience performances broadcast direct from the legendary Ricky Tick Club in Windsor. Fame was different; he played soul, blues, dance music, ballads, ska/blue beat, vocalese, big band jazz, hillbilly, New Orleans and even World Music, decades before that term was invented. For anyone who wishes to explore this world, the 2CD set you have here offers the very best of guided tours. To quote Georgie from “Night Train”: All aboard children! 16 page booklet with notes by Dave Stephens.
    1. Around And Around
    2. Off The Hook
    3. Time Is On My Side
    4. It's All Over Now
    5. I'm Alright
    6. Let's Get Together
    7. Carol
    8. Not Fade Away
    9. Carol
    10. Mona
    11. Not Fade Away
    12. High Heel Sneakers
    13. I Just Want To Make Love To You
    14. Ad Break – Rice Krispies
    15. I Wanna Be Your Man
    16. You Better Move On
    17. Roll Over Beethoven
    18. Beautiful Delilah
    19. Around And Around
    20. Time Is on My Side
    21. Not Fade Away
    22. I Just Want To Make Love To You
    23. I'm Alright
    24. I Just Want To Make Love To You
    25. Not Fade Away
    26. Not Fade Away (take 1)
    27. Beautiful Delilah
    28. Walking The Dog
    29. High Heel Sneakers
    30. Susie Q
    31. Mona
    32. High Heel Sneakers/Not Fade Away
    33. I'm Movin' On
  • Out of stock
    London’s nightclubs have been shaking to the rockin’ sounds of jive, blues and rock’n’roll for the past fifty years and to celebrate this fact, here is aa selection of tracks as part of the Rumba Blues series, that have been getting the cats on the dance floor at Soho’s Hidden Charms nights. The disc is full of Latin beats with rumbas, boleros and tumbaos to the fore. The New Orleans inverted son clave features on four tracks and there’s a bit of jazz and blues to spice things up. The guys dubbed the tracks direct from disc as they were all currently unavailable on CD at time of writing. So if you were there or wish you’d been there, here’s your chance to listen to some rediscovered hidden charms at home! RANDB027
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    Rhythm & Blues Records presents a new series of double CDs highlighting the 240 or so songs most frequently performed by British beat and blues artists. Volume One spotlights the pre-Beatles skiffle and folk era and ties this in to the Blues Boom group material of the late 1960s. Three further volumes concentrate on Merseybeat, the London scene and the jazz and soul sounds that influenced the mod movement. In the late 1960s, when US college youth were likely to buy anything British labelled ‘heavy', ‘progressive' or  ‘blues', the brand-leaders of the British Invasion: The Rolling Stones, Fleetwood Mac, Cream, Ten Years After, The Jeff Beck Group and Led Zeppelin were, without exception, born out of the American music included in this fascinating collection.

    Teenagers in post-war America weren't particularly fond of folk, blues or country and western; that was the stuff that their parents liked. Yet to some of their counterparts in ration-book Britain, this music seemed to offer messages from an intriguing culture half a world away. Lonnie Donegan's hit album 'King of Skiffle' engendered a craze among British teenagers for reproducing and even recording these sounds in their suburban bedrooms or provincial youth clubs, on cheap guitars and homemade instruments. The skiffle sound spread like wildfire across the UK before its more discerning practitioners reverted, towards a more rock 'n' roll style, taking their fusion back to North America whence it had come, in a 'British Invasion'.

    R005

  • Out of stock

    Rhythm & Blues Records presents a new series of double CDs highlighting the 240 or so songs most frequently performed by British beat and blues artists. Volume One spotlights the pre-Beatles skiffle and folk era and ties this in to the Blues Boom group material of the late 1960s. Three further volumes concentrate on Merseybeat, the London scene and the jazz and soul sounds that influenced the mod movement. In the late 1960s, when US college youth were likely to buy anything British labelled ‘heavy', ‘progressive' or  ‘blues', the brand-leaders of the British Invasion: The Rolling Stones, Fleetwood Mac, Cream, Ten Years After, The Jeff Beck Group and Led Zeppelin were, without exception, born out of the American music included in this fascinating collection.

    Teenagers in post-war America weren't particularly fond of folk, blues or country and western; that was the stuff that their parents liked. Yet to some of their counterparts in ration-book Britain, this music seemed to offer messages from an intriguing culture half a world away. Lonnie Donegan's hit album 'King of Skiffle' engendered a craze among British teenagers for reproducing and even recording these sounds in their suburban bedrooms or provincial youth clubs, on cheap guitars and homemade instruments. The skiffle sound spread like wildfire across the UK before its more discerning practitioners reverted, towards a more rock 'n' roll style, taking their fusion back to North America whence it had come, in a 'British Invasion'.

    R013

  • Out of stock

    Rhythm & Blues Records presents a new series of double CDs highlighting the 240 or so songs most frequently performed by British beat and blues artists. Volume One spotlights the pre-Beatles skiffle and folk era and ties this in to the Blues Boom group material of the late 1960s. Three further volumes concentrate on Merseybeat, the London scene and the jazz and soul sounds that influenced the mod movement. In the late 1960s, when US college youth were likely to buy anything British labelled ‘heavy', ‘progressive' or  ‘blues', the brand-leaders of the British Invasion: The Rolling Stones, Fleetwood Mac, Cream, Ten Years After, The Jeff Beck Group and Led Zeppelin were, without exception, born out of the American music included in this fascinating collection.

    Teenagers in post-war America weren't particularly fond of folk, blues or country and western; that was the stuff that their parents liked. Yet to some of their counterparts in ration-book Britain, this music seemed to offer messages from an intriguing culture half a world away. Lonnie Donegan's hit album 'King of Skiffle' engendered a craze among British teenagers for reproducing and even recording these sounds in their suburban bedrooms or provincial youth clubs, on cheap guitars and homemade instruments. The skiffle sound spread like wildfire across the UK before its more discerning practitioners reverted, towards a more rock 'n' roll style, taking their fusion back to North America whence it had come, in a 'British Invasion'.

    R014

  • Dance crazes have come and gone in America ever since the roaring twenties, but nothing quite compares to the epidemic of dance fever that hit the USA in the early 60s brought on by the twist and the rise and rise of soul music. The country was infected by wave after wave of catchy dance rhythms, each necessitating new moves on the dance floor. Everybody was getting a bit of that new soul bug! This collection brings you only a small proportion of the 100s and 100s of dance records produced between 1960 and 1965, before the soul industry got away from the promotion of dance records. There may have been dance rages in the next several decades, but nothing else comes even close to the 1960s for its sheer energy and diversity.

    SOUL031
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    In a comprehensive overview from 1927 to 1963, History of Soul Records’ 8CD anthology covers the genesis of soul music, tracing connections between R&B, jazz and blues, and gospel, the secular and the sacred. As popular black musical genres were adopted by white teenage audiences in the 1950s, black music reverted to more authentic, basic styles. By 1960, the sound of black popular music had turned away from a driving, largely uptempo rhythm and blues towards a more emotionally poignant style. The term ‘soul’ popped up here and there, but only became common parlance after the release of Ray Charles’s I Believe To My Soul at the end of 1959.

    The growing Civil Rights movement, the rise of the 45rpm record and the introduction of the electric guitar all played their part in the creation of a new sound. Detroit had Berry Gordy’s Motown, Chicago had Curtis Mayfield and the Impressions and New York had Atlantic Records along with white songwriters Burt Bacharach and Jerry Ragavoy producing their uptown soul. Down south, Stax was setting Memphis alight, Fame were starting up in Muscle Shoals, and New Orleans was putting funk into the mix. By 1963, soul had gone mainstream. There were more soulful records in the charts in 1962 alone than there had been in the whole of the 1950s.

    This collection of breathtaking blues and spiritual music brings you some of the most impassioned, compelling vocal performances ever to be recorded. The accompanying illustrated 36-page book sets out the historical background and explains some of the technical features that make these beautiful songs the precursors of soul music.

    WHAT THE CRITICS SAY

    This one is a corker...every bit as epic as it sounds... It’s hard to know where to begin with such a monumental and thorough anthology – especially one as full of highlights as this

    Lauren Laverne BBC 6 Music

    Mammoth and magnificent anthology...While there can be no package large enough to represent all the players, Sacred To Secular has a worthy stab at it, excavating as close as possible to the core and acting both as a cultural document and an excellent crash course in one of music’s most epochal periods. Fiona Sturges Uncut

    Embrace this journey through a lost era...the real thrill lies in discovering lesser names especially from the fringes of gospel, whose work is every bit as stirring Clive Davies Sunday Times 

    It’s common knowledge that soul developed largely from gospel; but that journey has never been as extensively mapped as on this eight-CD compilation 5 star review in The Independent

    SOUL004
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    'A perfect compilation, features familiar names & obscure artists who deserve their place in musical history,as educational as it is entertaining and is worth adding to your collection...I learned a lot from reading the liner notes. When I make some new discoveries, that's a real bonus.' Errol Nazareth, presenter on CBC, Canadian Broadcasting Company

    SOUL007
  • Out of stock

    'A perfect compilation, features familiar names & obscure artists who deserve their place in musical history,as educational as it is entertaining and is worth adding to your collection...I learned a lot from reading the liner notes. When I make some new discoveries, that's a real bonus.' Errol Nazareth, presenter on CBC, Canadian Broadcasting Company

    SOUL009
  • Includes fully illustrated booklet. The Coasters are widely considered to be the pre-eminent vocal group of the original rock ´n´ roll era both in sound and attitude, and to have created some of the best vocal group harmonies ever waxed. They had made their musical debut as the Robins during the early years of rhythm and blues and as the Coasters they contributed to shape rock'n'roll with some of the most cheeky, exciting and entertaining songs of the 50s. The original line-up disbanded early but the crucial team of singers and their mentors Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, moved from California to New York and created most of the greatest hits we know today. They were important influences for many later artists who covered their songs, such as the Beatles, the Stones, the Who and the Kinks. This compilation includes 19 hits listed in the Billboard pop and R&B charts between 1956 and 1962 and an accompanying 24-page booklet with many rare photos and notes on the group's evolution. Superlative compilations of essential American music history Not many groups of any kind can claim to have such a distinct influence on pop and rock n roll music as The Coasters. Their lengthy string of iconic hits, mostly courtesy of the pen of their mentors and genius song writing team Leiber & Stoller, and also their unique blend of personality and vocal harmony, took the mixture of doo wop, rock n roll, soul and jazz to new territory, and put them at the pinnacle of the original Rock n Roll and R’n’B era. Covered by everyone from The Beach Boys, Elvis, Zappa, Leon Russell, Alex Harvey, the Grateful Dead, these tunes were also central to the Brit Beat boom of the early 60s (Hamburg-era Beatles’ live set was heavy on Coasters covers). In addition, it’s difficult to understate the sheer magnitude of their influence on popular music; Put simply; these are the explosive and innovative bricks and mortar of all the rock n roll and R’n’B you’ve ever loved. These two new lavishly packaged and annotated double CD collections from the ‘History of RnB’ stable certainly do justice to the legacy and the fantastic energy of this incendiary, funny, and entertaining music. This is energetic music that screams youth, attitude and sass, with jokes, wit, satire and risque humour in spades (the likes of ‘Little Egypt’ were banned on release) that even after all this time still leap from the speakers at full pelt. The Definitive Coasters – The A & B sides collects both sides of the groups first 30 7” singles from their faultless run comprising 1954 to 1962. As such, the crammed-full first disc of A-Sides is as damn near perfect as an 80 minute receptacle of music can conceivably be, and an essential inclusion for anyone with even a passing interest in the development of American music. The B sides disc, quite understandably, has a moderately lower strike rate, and features some less exceptional ballads when compared with the vibrancy of the revolutionary hits, however its hard to argue with the likes of the genuinely funky ‘Turtle Dovin’ and ‘What is the Secret of Your Success’ which both rank as high as any A-Side. Absolutely essential. Those Hoodlum Friends…Coasters in Stereo comprises 49 tracks of rare stereo takes of some of the hits and also key album cuts and out-takes, as well as a full disc packed with composite studio tracks and alternate versions and studio chatter from the archive, many of which have never been released before. Jazz standards like ‘Moonglow’, ‘Autumn Leaves’, ‘Moonlight in Vermont’ and ‘Sunny Side of the Street’ are recorded with orchestras and show a more polished traditional jazz and balladeering side to their style, which although perfectly good is not quite as exciting as their more forthright material. While many early stereo recordings are inferior to their mono comparisons, the mixes here are sharp, luxurious and well defined. Definitely one for the already converted, collectors and connoisseurs, but it’s a look at this important music from a slightly altered angle (‘Run Red Run’ and ‘The Snake and the Bookworm’ offer very fresh perspectives in their alternate forms). Both these generous collections are finely packaged, expertly compiled sets, that are lovingly annotated with encyclopedic attention to detail. History has never been so much damn good fun! Ian Fildes AmericanaUK 9/10 A simply fabulous collection! If you missed out on the limited edition four CD set issued by Rhino Handmade in 2007 the History Of RnB label comes to the rescue with two double sets featuring everything that this fabulous group recorded for Spark and Atco between 1954 and 1962 including a couple of items that were not on the Rhino set but omitting the post 1962 recordings which were generally not as good as the earlier sides. Set comes with 24 page booklet with informative notes, rare photos, label shots and posters. A fabulous set with great sound. Roots & Rhythm R001
  • Henry Glover was the first producer/writer in the American music industry, paving the way for a host of illustrious followers such as Phil Spector, Leiber & Stoller and Burt Bacharach. Composer, producer, arranger, publisher, talent scout, vocalist, trumpet player, engineer, A&R executive, and, later, a label owner in his own right, Glover was one of the most talented music industry entrepreneurs of the mid-twentieth century. The fact that he was black and working in an exclusively white executive environment makes his achievements all the more remarkable. Glover’s career illustrates the evolution of modern popular music from its beginnings in jazz and blues, through its mutation into rhythm and blues, rock’n’roll and pop, culminating in soul and rock music. His first compositions in the forties were for mainstream artists such as Ella Fitzgerald and Dinah Washington in the big band and orchestral mould, but he established himself in the early fifties as a composer of risqué blues such as The Swallows’ It Ain’t The Meat (It’s The Motion), Wynonie Harris’s I Like My Baby’s Pudding and Bull Moose Jackson’s I Want a Bowlegged Woman as well as a host of drinking songs. Glover’s formative years were spent at Cincinnati-based King Records and the majority of hits on that label during its golden era from 1947 to 1958 were Henry Glover productions, most notably Little Willie John’s original 1955 version of Fever. He was equally at home with white country music and black sacred gospel music. His hillbilly song Blues Stay Away from Me has attained the status of classic in its field with versions by such diverse artists as B.B.King, Merle Haggard, Harry James, K.D.Lang and Tennessee Ernie Ford. His pioneering work with Moon Mullican and Hawkshaw Hawkins combining blues and country predates Elvis Presley’s Sun recordings by several years. His best-known song in the soul genre was Ray Charles’s 1960 number one hit Drown In My Own Tears. Towards the end of the fifties, Glover tried his hand at doo-wop and rock’n’roll music, but he found his greatest success in the dance craze era of the early 1960s with songs such as Peppermint Twist, Let The Little Girl Dance and California Sun, later covered by The Ramones. In later years, Glover channelled his energies into finding new artists and forming his own record label (he launched the careers of The Hawks, who mutated into The Band, and of the recently departed Nick Ashford). One of his last productions was Muddy Waters’s swansong The Woodstock Album, which won a Grammy in 1975. RANDB020 Produced as CD-R (professionally manufactured recordable CD printed for short run) as opposed to CD-P (professionally manufactured pressed CDs made in quantities of 500+). All CDs whether CD-R or CD-P are 100% guaranteed error free. Discs will always be replaced if any problems are encountered. 36-page booklet included
  • 1960 was the year that Instrumentals hit the charts in a big way with guitar or sax-led rockers and slinky organ groovers. Here are the discs that teenagers wanted to hear in the juke joints: exciting, uptempo stompers with catchy, melodic riffs, along with slow, soulful, down home blues. This compilation throws the spotlight on instrumentals by artists more widely associated with vocals, along with more obscure artists who may only have had one or two releases to their name. ...absolutely cracking double CD of 57 superb R&B instrumentals from a vintage year...we’ve just finished whipping through it and it’s going on again in 5 minutes! More please! New Gandy Dancer RANDB034
  • 1960 may have been the year that Instrumentals hit the charts in a big way, but it was in 1961, that their hold on the hit parade was consolidated with a good number of guitar or sax-led rockers and slinky organ groovers. These are the discs that teenagers wanted to hear in the juke joints: exciting, uptempo stompers with catchy, melodic riffs, and slow, soulful, down home blues. Our compilation throws the spotlight on instrumentals by artists who are more widely associated with vocals, along with more obscure musicians who may only have one or two releases to their name. We hope you enjoy these grooves and if you like what you hear from 1961, just wait till you find out what was on offer in 1959, and in 1960! RANDB038 Awesome R&B instro Cd's - well pleased and great to hear a load of new material. Just when I thought I'd heard it all! Graham Cann These are two mighty instrumental collections from R&B Records...with no real duds amongst them. A veritable cornucopia of fine sounds which will be of interest to all instrumentally minded fans of R&B. Fred Rothwell Blues & Rhythm
  • This is the latest of a terrific series of classic 1960's British jazz… digging a good deal deeper into the jazz side, and, moreover, offering the considerable bonus of rare as hen's teeth UK jazz 7"/EP and LPs with a second CD of American jazz…Rounding off an excellent overview of the club scene are the terrific black and white photos and these capture the atmosphere to perfection. Extensive liner notes come courtesy of Paul 'Smiler' Anderson. A fascinating insight into the kind of music that was played in the hipper clubs of the era... A good, if expensive, time to be a 1960s jazz devotee. Tim Stenhouse UK Vibe A little difficult to grasp: 1961 - The British Perspective by Simon Spillett Not so long ago, the unlikelihood of the Briton as a jazzman would have been perfectly expressed by thinking of him in a bowler hat. Result: complete incongruity, like Mrs Grundy dancing the can-can. Philip Larkin, The Daily Telegraph, July 15th 1961 It's hard to work out what caused the biggest noise in British jazz circles back in 1961. Was it the one and only UK visit of John Coltrane, the first bona-fide American avant-gardist to play to an English audience, whose London début was dismissed in Jazz Journal as “the low water mark of jazz in this country.” Or was it the installation of a new espresso machine at Ronnie Scott's club, “the most out-of-tune contraption of its kind in all of Britain,” according to Jazz News, issuing “steaming sibilance...guaranteed to blast almost any soloist out of audial existence.” Then again, perhaps it could have been the clamouring wheels of the Trad bandwagon, pushing its way up the mountainous slopes of the popular charts? Actually the big story of the year wasn't one at club or concert level, although both appeared to be doing well. Despite the predictions of nay-sayers and the odd spat with other West End promoters (“From Monday to Thursday, the Flamingo quietly folds its wings and drops dead,” observed Scott in December 1960), Ronnie Scott's had survived for just over a year, its successes coming in fits and starts not unlike the splutterings of its new espresso maker. The coffee machine was a good sign though, as was the long-awaited installation of a bar at the premises in April 1961, an event only made possible by the formation of the club’s own “wine committee”, of which Benny Green made a puzzled secretary. Ronnie's was by no means the only London modern jazz spot doing well. Regardless of Scott's jibe, The Flamingo continued to pull the punters, pressed into what one magazine called its “dark, Turkish-bath, but always swinging, atmosphere.” Further afield there was success too; opened in January 1961, by November of the same year Klooks Kleek in West Hampstead boasted a membership of 1600, no mean feat for a venue promoting solely local attractions. On the touring package front, things also looked to be on the up. A welcome relief from what had already begun to seem like a veritable carousel of mainstream and big band artists, the visits of Art Blakey, Thelonious Monk and Coltrane had shown a distinct shift towards the modern, with their respective bands introducing then largely unknown new stars such as Elvin Jones, Eric Dolphy and Wayne Shorter to local audiences. Each of these visits caused moments both controversial and thought-provoking, some less well-publicised than others, including Elvin Jones' memorably Dadaist sit-in at Scott's, which brought delight to some (Tubby Hayes) and dismay to others (a well-known British trumpeter who was moved to scoff “that man can't count four bars!”). Another US visitor that year – bassist Charles Mingus, in England to appear in the jazz-does-Shakespeare film novelty All Night Long – hung around long enough to get more of a measure of the parochial scene, holding court in a series of interviews which found him unafraid to confront what he saw as the failings of the UK's jazzmen. “The trouble here, so far as I can see, is that everyone's listening to records and taking their cues from these,” he remarked perceptively. “It seems to me if our records weren't issued in Britain, the British cats would have to think for themselves.” Balancing this critique, Mingus had been quick to praise those local players who he did think were onto something of their own, including Ronnie Scott and Joe Harriott (“he's got a good sound”) in whose free-form experiments he recognised the spirit of a fellow maverick . As cutting as Mingus was, his remarks about “our records” had an almost laughable irony to them. The label to which he was then signed – Candid – hadn't yet found a UK distributor. Indeed, local modernists weren't nearly as up-to-date as their album-chasing legend might have us believe, something rammed home early in 1961 by the arrival in the UK of the Blue Note catalogue, arguably the finest on-record representation of modern jazz to date. If the label had long exemplified the height of hip to US jazz listeners, its message had taken an age to find English ears. Hitherto available as super-inflated imports or sailor-smuggled luxuries (Tony Hall recalls paying an astronomical £4 per LP in the late 1950s), a deal struck with Central Record Distributors meant that from February 1961, Blue Notes were now regularly available in the UK for the first time. Regardless of a still-expensive price tag (49/9 each, 12/- more than an average British 12” LP), the demand was ridiculous, with Doug Dobell's famed London record shops' initial stock selling out in less than ten days. Within seven months, Blue Note had sold four times as many albums as they'd budgeted for, good news for record retailers and fans but a further kick in the teeth to those trying to sell local modern jazz on record. The timing couldn't have been more bittersweet. Shortly after Blue Note began to appear in the racks, Tony Hall finally threw in the towel at Tempo, the label that had almost single-handedly documented the harder end of UK modernism for close to five years. Tempo's final modern jazz release – The Jazz Five's The Five Of Us – had received good press, but as a commercial commodity it had been a dead loss. “When you can buy a Miles Davis LP for a couple of bob less, can you really afford to buy, say, Tubby Hayes' latest, however much you dig British jazz?” Hall had asked ruefully in Jazz News. If the question was somewhat academic, there were nevertheless some signs of a welcome change of pace. At the eye of the Trad hurricane, in February 1961, Johnny Dankworth's incessantly catchy African Waltz three-foured its way into the popular charts, selling a staggering 24,000 copies in a month. Barely had this news broken than Tubby Hayes put his moniker to a contract with Fontana, “the first British modernist to be signed to a major label in some years,” reported Melody Maker excitedly. Indeed, the big noise in British modernism that year wasn't in the clubs, at festivals or on the radio - it was on record. And, like all things in British jazz, it was a tale of equal parts triumph and disaster. The latter were all too easy to under-sensationalise: the end of Tempo, Blue Note's dismissal of its one ex-British artist (Alfred Lion: “the public did not really take to our recordings of Dizzy Reece”), the Musicians' Union putting the block on Dizzy Gillespie recording in London. After all, hadn't this been the story for years now? But, for once, the triumphs seemed to be coming in greater numbers; that year the US Riverside subsidiary Jazzland licensed recordings by The Jazz Couriers, The Joe Harriott Quintet and The Vic Ash-Harry Klein Jazz Five for Stateside release (“MUST HAVE!” Jazzland's Bill Grauer had cabled Tony Hall on hearing the Ash/Klein tapes); pianist Dave Lee's album 'A Big New Band From Britain' spent six weeks in the famed US 'Cash Box Top Ten'; and Don Rendell found himself the first British modernist signed exclusively to an American label - also Jazzland - (“Forgotten Jazzman nets big disc deal” Melody Maker), effectively resuscitating his career. Rendell wasn't the only beneficiary. Almost overnight, it was as if the lifeblood had been pumped back into British modernism. Cool, it seemed, was well and truly out. “Filling the void is something which should inject a new life into the whole modern scene,” wrote Melody Maker's Bob Dawbarn that summer, “- excitement”. It was hard not to sense a burgeoning confidence beginning to infuse the music. All of a sudden, local modern LPs began to receive rave reviews, with one – Tubby Hayes' initial salvo for Fontana, Tubbs – named Melody Maker's Jazz LP of the Month in July 1961, succeeding none other than John Coltrane's Blue Train. There was even sign of an end to the closed shop mentality that had for so long kept British bop hemmed in. Hot on the heels of signing Tubby Hayes, Fontana had also bagged twenty year old Dick Morrissey, a saxophonist whose precocious ability came close to that of Hayes himself. “I'm still trying to find a really serious grouse with the whole thing,” wrote Jazz News's Kevin Henriques reviewing Morrissey's debut disc, as if it just wasn't cricket to favour the local lads. Even those not generally sympathetic to contemporary jazz styles had at last begun to yield. In late 1961, Denis Preston – Lansdowne studio’s maven of mainstream and a leading architect in building the Trad Boom – recorded the Emcee Five, a frighteningly accomplished “territory band” from Newcastle upon Tyne, the mere existence of which said everything about how deeply modernism had taken root throughout the UK. Where it should venture next was obvious. Having successfully exported recordings by its leading exponents – Harriott, Scott, Dankworth – to the US, it was now only a matter of time until we exported the real thing, a pipe-dream that became a reality in September 1961, when Tubby Hayes inaugurated a UK/US soloist exchange deal enabling American players to appear at Ronnie Scott's club while their English opposites played New York. Earlier that year, Hayes had complained, “the British scene is very limiting. It is difficult to get beyond working around the Wardour Street-Gerrard Street area.” Now, he was working Hudson and Spring, attracting audiences including Miles Davis and Cannonball Adderley, a sure fire sign that British modernism had finally made the biggest leap of its short-life – one as much cultural as artistic. The story of this transatlantic détente was set out on record for all to hear: Hayes recording in New York with a band including Clark Terry, while Zoot Sims was taped over several nights at Ronnie Scott's club, sounding just as comfortable with his English accompanists as Hayes had with his US ones. It was the ultimate victory. “Even five years ago, [this] would have seemed like wishful thinking,” summed up Benny Green in his sleeve note to Tubbs in N.Y. “Even after hearing [this record] I find it all a little difficult to grasp.” What Hayes and has colleagues had grasped though – in essence the nettle of opportunity – was to prove particularly awkward to hang onto in the year ahead. Indeed, far down among the provincial undergrowth lay a threat few would have thought serious at the time. Yet it was there all the same. Reviewing the club scene in Liverpool at the end of 1961, Jazz News cautioned “you would be quite surprised at the 'jazz section' of the evening paper. Some of the groups that appear are called The Beetles [sic.], Undertakers and the Galvanisers...” The Beetles? The name said it all: this was to be one hard-shelled opponent. RANDB042
  • Johnny Burch is probably best-known for songs he wrote in 1963 for Georgie Fame such as “In The Meantime” and “Preach and Teach”. This was at a time when the boundaries between modern jazz, rhythm and blues and beat music were being broken down at such places as the Flamingo and the Marquee. For a few months, Burch was leader of a group that included several musicians who found fame in the blues and rock scene of the late 60s such as Graham Bond, Dick Heckstall-Smith, Jack Bruce and Ginger Baker. This CD features the earliest-known recordings of Bruce and Baker together in a live broadcast for the BBC from March 1963. It also contains five tracks from a session that Burch’s 1965 line-up recorded for BBC’s Band Beat. Burch was never a major figure in the London jazz scene but this collection highlights his group’s unique role which acted as a bridge between modern jazz and the nascent British R&B movement. RANDB055 Overall, an amazing collection of pieces, many obscure, some best described as period pieces but much to enjoy. Peter Vacher Jazzrag When one thinks of bassist Jack Bruce and drummer Ginger Baker, the name of Eric Clapton immediately comes to mind since the three masterful musicians formed Cream. However the first time that Bruce and Baker played together was not in a rock group but back in 1963 as members of the Johnny Burch Octet.     Pianist Johnny Burch (1932-2006) was part of the British jazz scene starting in 1959. After a period as a member of Allan Ganley’s Jazzmakers and with Don Rendell’s group, he evolved to become a leader in modern jazz without achieving much fame. He did get to accompany such visiting American greats as Freddie Hubbard, Red Rodney and Rahsaan Roland Kirk, and wrote a few songs for the popular singer Georgie Fame. Jazzbeat has Burch at the head of two different octets, playing live in 1963 and 1965. These seven selections have so-so recording quality but are full of plenty of excitement with the numbers including “Moanin’,” “Del Sasser,” and Burch’s “Nightwalk.” On both broadcasts, the playing is top-notch and at the level of their American counterparts. The music is very much in the modern mainstream of the mid-1960s, forward-looking while never hinting at the music of Cream. Scott Yanow Los Angeles Jazz Scene
  • The mambo was born in Cuba in 1938, of African and European parentage. It arrived in New York ten years later via Havana and Mexico City. 1954 was the year of the mambo in America as dancers flocked to the ballrooms to see exciting new bands led by Machito, Tito Puente, Perez Prado and Tito Rodriguez. To cash in on the craze, record companies encouraged their R&B artists to come up with songs in a Latin vein and to include the word mambo in the title. Latin rhythms have infiltrated every branch of popular music, but none has had such a wide ranging influence as the rumba. Its 3-3-2 rhythm, combined with the New Orleans second line beat, formed the basis of the Stax and Motown sound and the more complex rhythms of funk in the 1960s. RANDB041
  • This little gem… the extensive, well-written accompanying notes could usefully be used by anyone lecturing on the subjects. Brian Smith R2 If this collection doesn’t put an umbrella in your pina colada then you should see a doctor. There’s the genuinely hard-core instrumental Latin gems bristling with brass such as the Griffin Brothers with Griff’s Mambo, and Illinois Jacquet’s terrific sexy sax on Mambocito Mio. And if you’re thinking this might be all snake hips and exotic women’s hats piled with fruit, there are even Latin tracks from Chuck Berry, Howlin’ Wolf and Elmore James. As a collection to dance to, this is a brilliant idea. Olé! Git down and boogie…er…mambo. Blues Matters 24-page booklet included RANDB012 Produced as CD-R (professionally manufactured recordable CD printed for short run) as opposed to CD-P (professionally manufactured pressed CDs made in quantities of 500+). All CDs whether CD-R or CD-P are 100% guaranteed error free. Discs will always be replaced if any problems are encountered.  
  • This little gem… the extensive, well-written accompanying notes could usefully be used by anyone lecturing on the subjects. Brian Smith R2 If this collection doesn’t put an umbrella in your pina colada then you should see a doctor. There’s the genuinely hard-core instrumental Latin gems bristling with brass such as the Griffin Brothers with Griff’s Mambo, and Illinois Jacquet’s terrific sexy sax on Mambocito Mio. And if you’re thinking this might be all snake hips and exotic women’s hats piled with fruit, there are even Latin tracks from Chuck Berry, Howlin’ Wolf and Elmore James. As a collection to dance to, this is a brilliant idea. Olé! Git down and boogie…er…mambo. Blues Matters RANDB012 Produced as CD-R (professionally manufactured recordable CD printed for short run) as opposed to CD-P (professionally manufactured pressed CDs made in quantities of 500+). All CDs whether CD-R or CD-P are 100% guaranteed error free. Discs will always be replaced if any problems are encountered. 24-page booklet included