SOUL

  • The History of Rhythm and Blues series of CDs brings you the accidental synthesis of jazz, gospel, blues, ragtime, country, pop and Latin into a definable form of black music, which would influence pretty well all popular music from the 1950s to the present. It is the first attempt to put together a cross-label compilation showcasing the most important and influential records in the rise of Rhythm & Blues. This exhilarating compilation …is a distillation of a four-CD set; as such, it’s an exceptionally strong collection, each of the 25 tracks a discovery, a joy. The liner notes are worth the price in themselves: Well-written and entertaining, they detail not only the history of each artist, but the context of each song…The most recent song on the album was recorded more than 65 years ago, but this is no dusty exercise in musicology. This is creative, vibrant music. Even today, it quickens the pulse. M.D.Spenser Blog May 2009 Anyone looking for a great sampler to hear some of the classic early rhythm and blues could do worse than to check out this 25-track release…As an introduction to early blues and more this compilation takes some beating – and to anyone doing research or a historian – I would imagine pretty essential, well done to compiler, Nick Duckett and to all concerned. GRAHAME RHODES RANDB002
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    Dance crazes have come and gone in America ever since the roaring twenties, but nothing quite compares to the epidemic of dance fever that hit the USA in the early 60s brought on by the twist and the rise and rise of soul music. The country was infected by wave after wave of catchy dance rhythms, each necessitating new moves on the dance floor. Everybody was getting a bit of that new soul bug! This collection brings you only a small proportion of the 100s and 100s of dance records produced between 1960 and 1965, before the soul industry got away from the promotion of dance records. There may have been dance rages in the next several decades, but nothing else comes even close to the 1960s for its sheer energy and diversity.

    SOUL031
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    Late night, swinging soul and rockin' blues... Tracks that not only accompanied the dance crazes of the time, but also showcase the essential elements that inspired them. The strong recurring bass riff, four-to-the-floor beat, and blasting horns all influenced the tight choreography of The Temptations in Detroit through to the improvised moves of the dancers in the soul clubs of the midlands and north of England

    SOUL027  
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    OHIO SOUL 2CD

    £5.00

    Before the Second World War, the African American population of Ohio was small and concentrated in the southern part of the State, mainly in Cincinnatti; black music recordings from that era in the state are pretty rare. But the great northward migration from the old slave states during and after the war drew large numbers of blacks to the factories of Akron, Dayton and particularly Cleveland. This encouraged musical entrepreneurs to establish independent recording companies in Ohio that produced music for the new populations. The state's powerhouse for music was of course the King label and its subsidiaries run by the iron fist of Syd Nathan in Cincinnati. So it is quite appropriate that this CD set has a preponderance of tracks from this source, and from King's Chicago outpost.

    SOUL026
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    Volume Two 1962-1965 African American popular music was mostly known as Rhythm and Blues in 1962, the beginning of the era covered in this collection. But by the end of the period, 1965, the music was universally called Soul. The Chicago music industry exploded with the growth of soul music in this period, producing thousands of records and dozens and dozens of new labels. The two biggest black music labels Vee-Jay and Chess led in the creation of the Chicago soul brand with names familiar and not so familiar: the former with Etta James and Tony Adams and the latter with Gene Chandler and Moss Tolbert. And yet it's the smaller labels that make up the bulk of the Chicago story: Conlo with Jamo Thomas, Blue Rock with Otis Leaville, Ja-Wes with Sandra Stephens and it's here that we explore some of the finest sounds of the era in this collection.

    SOUL032
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    The black music scene in post war America was dominated by the emerging urban, electrified R&B scene in Chicago. Nearby Detroit was musically dwarfed, with much of its talent being drawn to the Windy City, but as the 50s drew to a close, things began to change. Detroit’s population bulge coincided with the consumer boom, making its age profile younger than its neighbour’s. Thousands of southern black migrants were joined by many immigrants from Europe come to work in the automobile industry. Henry Ford’s pay was good, and with plenty of disposable income available for its inhabitants, Detroit became the goodtime capital of the USA.

    Hundreds of bars, clubs and backroom record labels emerged, hosting a tidal wave of new talent. By 1960, although it was still too early for any definitive Detroit sound to be identifiable, the city was developing a lighter, more popular style than neighbouring Chicago. It was spearheaded by a young man from Gladstone Street, whose distinctive Motown sound went on to dominate the 60s pop charts.

    The tracks on these CDs represent the cream of this transitional pre-Motown era, when various labels, artists and producers were putting out popular music that they hoped might get noticed and sell enough to make them rich and famous. In 1963, Detroit had by far the fastest growing black music industry in the USA, not just recorded music but a live gig scene just as prolific. Back then no one knew that Berry Gordy Jr would emerge victorious and define the Detroit sound for the decade that followed.

    Sit back and enjoy another batch of Detroit gems.

    In the 32 page booklet, each track is given a quarter-page with details of the release plus label shots, period photographs and interesting notes from Keith Rylatt...Overall this is terrific music with great presentation and is a real source for discovery...This compilation should appeal to all readers who have soul in their system... An excellent release and worth investigating. Blues & Rhythm Keith Scoffham

    As with previous History Of Soul product reviewed on this site, the selection has been well thought-out and the presentation is top-notch, appeal here going well beyond the core niche of Detroit devotees.' Basement Group David Cole. STAR PICK*****

    SOUL023
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    The black music scene in post war America was dominated by the emerging urban, electrified R&B scene in Chicago. Nearby Detroit was musically dwarfed, with much of its talent being drawn to the Windy City, but as the 50s drew  to a close, things began to change. Detroit’s population bulge coincided with the consumer boom, making its age profile younger than its neighbour’s. Thousands of southern black migrants were joined by many immigrants from Europe come to work in the automobile industry. Henry Ford’s pay was good, and with plenty of disposable income available for its inhabitants, Detroit became the goodtime capital of the USA.

    Hundreds of bars, clubs and backroom record labels emerged, hosting a tidal wave of new talent. By 1960, although it was still too early for any definitive Detroit sound to be identifiable, the city was developing a lighter, more popular style than neighbouring Chicago. It was spearheaded by a young man from Gladstone Street, whose distinctive Motown sound went on to dominate the 60s pop charts.

    The tracks on this CD represent the cream of this transitional pre-Motown era, when various labels, artists and producers were putting out popular music that they hoped might get noticed and sell enough to make them rich and famous. Back then no one knew that Berry Gordy Jr would emerge victorious and define the Detroit sound for the decade that followed. 'As with previous History Of Soul product reviewed on this site, the selection has been well thought-out and the presentation is top-notch, appeal here going well beyond the core niche of Detroit devotees.' Basment Group B Cole ..STAR PICK***** SOUL013
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    In the early 1960s, African American music styles were still hugely diverse, and several regions had their own distinctive style. The West Coast was generally quite pop-oriented, yet the magnificent Bobby Taylor and Alexander Patton prove that there were plenty of deep, soulful singers located in California. Here's another full-tilt collection of the very best that the busiest LA studios had to offer in the early-mid sixties. Quality music from 50 years ago that still moves the feet and the heart. Timeless! SOUL029
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    The glory days for soul music in Philadelphia were the 70s, when the smooth orchestral Philly sound stood tall in the charts, and when writer/producers like Thom Bell, Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff were at the peak of their powers and when almost every soul singer and group travelled to Philly hoping some of the magic would rub off on them.

    But this success didn’t happen overnight. Philadelphia was a major music centre long before, particularly in the late 50s when Dick Clark’s Bandstand TV show was the biggest in the US. This platform developed in the 60s as Philly consolidated its position as a key recording location for pop and soul.

    This CD set traces the way disparate musical elements led to the ascent of Philly soul. Groups have always been central to music in Philadelphia and there are plenty of groups here, singing soulful doo-wop and gospel-tinged R&B as these styles led into soul. There’s rhythm and blues too, the odd pop tune and instrumental - all ingredients in the mix that became America’s favourite music in the 70s.

    Soul lovers will find plenty to attract then here.. A very strong opening that assures the listener’s attention..Overall, a fine compilation and anyone with an interest in early soul music should take a listen. Norman Darwen – Blues & Rhythm

    Listen to this CD and you soon realize that Motown wasn’t made in a day, nor was the musical history of Detroit restricted to nothing other than Berry Gordy’s label. Most of the titles were previously unknown to me. The O'Jays and David Ruffin are unrecognizable, the Vandellas are getting on  very well for now without Martha, Sammy Ward sounds like Lowell Fulson, Barrett Strong sings a penniless version of Money and Harvey Fuqua is just as wild as Billy Stewart. Julien Cure – Soul Bag (France)

    SOUL024
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    By 1960, the sound of black popular music had turned away from a driving, largely uptempo rhythm and blues towards a more emotionally poignant style described at the time as secularised gospel. The term 'soul' popped up here and there, but only became common parlance after Ray Charles's I Believe To My Soul was released at the end of 1959. This compilation, part of the History of Soul series, brings together the finest tunes before soul went mainstream. We hope you will find the accompanying 28-page booklet interesting and informative.

    SOUL011
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    The “5” Royales were one of the greatest of all the R & B groups. Their ground breaking sides for Apollo from 1951 – 55 are rightly highly regarded for being amongst the very first to marry the rhythms and instrumental stylings of the blues with the vocal fire of gospel music. This innovation was not just daring and controversial but also highly successful – the Royales had five top ten hits including two number ones in a very short space of time. SOUL014
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    Volume Three presents all their Apollo recordings together with a disc of "5" Royales 1960s cuts, curios and outtakes.

    The "5" Royales were the very first group to merge secular and sacred musical influences into a coherent whole, laying down the future guidelines of soul music. These CDs contain some of the very best early soul and R&B ever recorded and the Royales' music still has the power and the passion to move us all. Long may it continue.

    SOUL016
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    Part of the 'History of Soul' series but a pleasure in its own right, this CD bears witness to the creation of a distinctive, smooth soul sound made in Chicago in the early 1960s that we associate with such legendary figures as Curtis Mayfield, Betty Everett and McKinley Mitchell. Black music was transitioning between R&B and soul at this time, and vocal groups were introducing a new gospel sensibility into their songs.

    The accompanying booklet is written by Robert Pruter, author of the acclaimed 'Chicago Soul'.

    'Contains some absolutely stunning tracks and I applaud the compilers for their selection. To add icing on the cake, the booklet is in the Ace/Kent league when it comes to sheer size and quality written by no other than Robert Pruter.' Keith Rylatt – Manifesto Soul Magazine

    This fine collection brings together the cream of Windy City soul from the years 1950 to 1962. As is often the case with these types of compilations, it's the obscure cuts that make them worthwhile and this one is no exception. Roots & Rhythm

    SOUL001
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    Instrumentals Soul-Style

    Club Sounds, a bit of funk, a Latin groove, a slow jazz walk, uptown dancers, late night smoochers. Plenty of organ. Plenty of soul. No twangy guitar. No swing jazz. No frantic honkin' and screamin'. Just Instrumentals Soul-Style.

    SOUL028  
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    There was way too much great early soul, R & B and blues being produced in New York City to squeeze onto one double CD, so here we are again with another selection of the best. Several artists on this new compilation are very well known: Ray Charles, Little Willie John and Ike & Tine Turner for example, but many others less so. It speaks volumes about the wealth of talent in the Big Apple around the turn of the 60s that gifted singers such as Ruby Roberson, Bobby Long and Betty O’Brien never quite made the grade.

    There is considerable variation in styles here too, from rough, untutored voices like King Coleman and Vernon Harrell to consummate stylists such as Chuck Jackson, Gladys Knight and of course Aretha Franklin. But alley blues and sophisticated uptown ballads alike played their part in the development of soul music. And therefore all the tracks on these CDs well deserve their inclusion in our History Of Soul series. Enjoy!

    'First off I must say that having discovered your compilations earlier this year - both r'n'b and soul - I am completely blown away by the breadth and depth, quality and value of these compilations. They immediately became 'must buys' until your release rate caused me to slow down before I bankrupted myself. Keep up the good work.' Malcolm Beattie (Rnb and Soul fan)

    SOUL019
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    As black popular music genres were adopted by white teenage audiences in the 1950s, there was a tendency for black music to revert to more authentic, basic styles. Towards the end of that decade, a new generation of black entrepreneurs sought to cash in on this trend by setting up innovative independent labels, which were to produce some of the best known names of twentieth century music such as Sam Cooke, Berry Gordy and Ray Charles. The growing civil rights movement, the rise of the 45rpm record and the electric guitar all played their part in the creation of a new sound. Part of the History of Soul series, the accompanying 32-page booklet sketches the historical background to a collection of exciting tracks from the 1950s and 60s.

    SOUL010
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    DISC ONE
    1. Edgar Hayes Fat Meat 'n' Greens
    2. Professor Longhair Tipitina
    3. Chris Powell Mambo Gunch
    4. Mose Allison The Seventh Son
    5. Ahmad Jamal Trio Poinciana
    6. Bill Doggett Hold It
    7. Ernie Freeman Live It Up
    8. Earl King Come On (Pts 1 & 2)
    9. Drits & Dravy Talk That Talk (Pt. 1)
    10. Ike & Tina Turner I Idolize You
    11. Jack McDuff Brother Jack
    12. James Brown And I Do Just What I Want
    13. Roy Montrell Mudd
    14. Sugar Pie DeSanto Can't Let You Go
    15. Al Robinson I'm Leaving You Today
    16. Earl King Trick Bag
    17. Eddie Bo Check Mr. Popeye
    18. The Isley Brothers Teach Me How To Shimmy
    19. Gino Parks Fire
    20. Joe 'Guitar' Morris The Git Back (Pt. 1)
    21. Prince La La She Put The Hurt On Me
    22. Stanley Turrentine Baia
    23. Fabulous Playboys Honkey Tonk Woman
    24. Vernon Harrel Slick Chick
    DISC TWO
    1. James Brown Mashed Potatoes U.S.A.
    2. Billy Stewart Fat Boy
    3. Jimmy Pace Stop My Heart From Crying
    4. Lee Dorsey People Gonna Talk
    5. Ernie K-Doe I Got To Find Somebody
    6. Marvin Gaye Hitch Hike
    7. Pistol Keep On Lovin' You
    8. Porgy & The Polka Dots Say Yeah
    9. Ray Johnson Soul City
    10. Shirley Raymond What a Wedding Day
    11. Fred Lowery Goodbye
    12. Spider Johnson Doin' The Popeye
    13. Huey 'Piano' Smith Talk To Me Baby
    14. Dolores Johnson What Kind Of Man Are You
    15. Turquinettes Tell Me The Truth
    16. Bob Bateman R B Special
    17. James Booker Big Nick
    18. Wallace Johnson Clap Your Hands
    19. Roosevelt Fountain Red Pepper (Pts 1 & 2)
    20. C. Davis Coolin' Out
    21. David Rockingham Trio Joy De Vie
    22. Bobby Mitchell You Got The Nerve
    23. James Brown I've Got Money
     
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    Side One 1. The Supremes Baby Love 2. The Miracles You Really Got A Hold On Me 3. Stevie Wonder I Call It Pretty Music 4. The Temptations The Way You Do The Things You Do 5. Martha & The Vandellas Heatwave 6. Dusty Springfield You Lost The Sweetest Boy 7. The Earl Van Dyke Sextet Vamp 8. The Miracles Ooo Baby Baby 9. Martha & The Vandellas & Dusty Springfield Wishin' And Hopin' 10. The Temptations It's Growing 11. The Supremes Shake 12. Martha & The Vandellas Nowhere To Run Side Two 1. Stevie Wonder Kiss Me Baby 2. Marvin Gaye Can I Get A Witness 3. Martha & The Vandellas & Dusty Springfield Can't Hear You No More 4. The Supremes Stop! In The Name Of Love 5. The Temptations My Girl 6. Martha & The Vandellas Dancing In The Street 7. The Miracles Shop Around 8. The Supremes Where Did Our Love Go? 9. The Miracles & Various Mickey's Monkey HS13
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    Side ONE 1. Don’t Leave Me Louie Palmer 2. Make Up Your Mind Eddie Floyd 3. I'm Not Through Loving You Lattimore Brown 4. Dancing Annie Ted Taylor 5. Sweetie Pie Homer Banks 6. What Made You Change Your Mind Bobby King 7. Papa's New Bag Ain't Nothing But A Hag Francine Carr Side TWO 1. Tender Love George Jackson 2. You Really Fooled Me Chris Harris 3. Everybody Makes A Mistake Sometimes Roy Arlington 4. Born Loser Larry Blakely 5. Mistreated Blues Willie Cobbs 6. A Whole Lot Of Tears Jeb Stuart 7. Early In The Morning Four Kings HS19
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    In a comprehensive overview from 1927 to 1963, History of Soul Records’ 8CD anthology covers the genesis of soul music, tracing connections between R&B, jazz and blues, and gospel, the secular and the sacred. As popular black musical genres were adopted by white teenage audiences in the 1950s, black music reverted to more authentic, basic styles. By 1960, the sound of black popular music had turned away from a driving, largely uptempo rhythm and blues towards a more emotionally poignant style. The term ‘soul’ popped up here and there, but only became common parlance after the release of Ray Charles’s I Believe To My Soul at the end of 1959.

    The growing Civil Rights movement, the rise of the 45rpm record and the introduction of the electric guitar all played their part in the creation of a new sound. Detroit had Berry Gordy’s Motown, Chicago had Curtis Mayfield and the Impressions and New York had Atlantic Records along with white songwriters Burt Bacharach and Jerry Ragavoy producing their uptown soul. Down south, Stax was setting Memphis alight, Fame were starting up in Muscle Shoals, and New Orleans was putting funk into the mix. By 1963, soul had gone mainstream. There were more soulful records in the charts in 1962 alone than there had been in the whole of the 1950s.

    This collection of breathtaking blues and spiritual music brings you some of the most impassioned, compelling vocal performances ever to be recorded. The accompanying illustrated 36-page book sets out the historical background and explains some of the technical features that make these beautiful songs the precursors of soul music.

    WHAT THE CRITICS SAY

    This one is a corker...every bit as epic as it sounds... It’s hard to know where to begin with such a monumental and thorough anthology – especially one as full of highlights as this

    Lauren Laverne BBC 6 Music

    Mammoth and magnificent anthology...While there can be no package large enough to represent all the players, Sacred To Secular has a worthy stab at it, excavating as close as possible to the core and acting both as a cultural document and an excellent crash course in one of music’s most epochal periods. Fiona Sturges Uncut

    Embrace this journey through a lost era...the real thrill lies in discovering lesser names especially from the fringes of gospel, whose work is every bit as stirring Clive Davies Sunday Times 

    It’s common knowledge that soul developed largely from gospel; but that journey has never been as extensively mapped as on this eight-CD compilation 5 star review in The Independent

    SOUL004
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    'A perfect compilation, features familiar names & obscure artists who deserve their place in musical history,as educational as it is entertaining and is worth adding to your collection...I learned a lot from reading the liner notes. When I make some new discoveries, that's a real bonus.' Errol Nazareth, presenter on CBC, Canadian Broadcasting Company

    SOUL007
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    'A perfect compilation, features familiar names & obscure artists who deserve their place in musical history,as educational as it is entertaining and is worth adding to your collection...I learned a lot from reading the liner notes. When I make some new discoveries, that's a real bonus.' Errol Nazareth, presenter on CBC, Canadian Broadcasting Company

    SOUL009
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    This box set is a companion piece to the 8CD set From Sacred To Secular: A Soul Awakening, which traced the history of soul music from its earliest antecedents in 1927 right up to the first true soul records released in 1962. Here we continue the story from 1962 up to the end of the decade, covering a large portion of soul music’s Golden Age with 100 tracks by soul’s greatest 60s superstars (from Aretha Franklin to Stevie Wonder) and a whole host of “lesser” names whose contribution to the musical genre shouldn’t be overlooked. The CDs cover all of soul’s many styles from early doo-wop and R&B influenced music to the funk grooves which were to prove so popular in the 70s. Other harbingers of the coming decade can be found here in the first sweet-soul Philly sounds from the Delfonics and Intruders, early funk rock  (Sly & The Family Stone) and Chicago’s renaissance via Curtis Mayfield and the Impressions. But this Soul Chronology differs from almost every other soul selection in that all the tracks on it are taken from live performances rather than vinyl sources.  These sounds are both more immediate and more personal than the records that may well be more familiar to listeners. The production values may be lower than original recordings due to the technological limitations of the period but in their place come the vibrancy of a live act, its intimacy and its raw impact, factors that don’t usually come through via vinyl or CD. And there is no place to hide in a live environment - the musicians and singers are able to show just how talented they were without any added tricks or enhancements that studio producers could offer. So if you want to know just how good the soul musicians and singers in the 60s really were, just check out these CDs. You may be amazed but you certainly won’t be disappointed! These compilation CDs are a true 'must have'…this indispensable music history document…belongs in the record collection of everyone who is fond of music. Rootstime This 4 CD set has been really good to hear. We are treated to the original artists at the top of their game…What better way to spend nearly six hours…A fine release. Keith Scoffham Blues & Rhythm
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    (shipped with booklet & CD inlays but without jewel case for cheaper airmail and less problems with EU customs)

    36 Page illustrated booklet.

    By the beginning of 1963, African-American music in New Orleans was in flux. Its happy-go-lucky R & B sound was no longer guaranteed to hit the national charts. In short, the good times in the city had run out of steam. The major issue now was what sort of music to record in the wake of the “British Invasion”. The answer of course was “soul”. Until soul became the ubiquitous African-American musical style, the music that was recorded in the city was a Louisiana gumbo of blues, R & B, gospel, swamp pop, anything and everything that might sell a few records.

    This set of CDs is the story of how one city, New Orleans, with its unique, proud and energetic history came to adopt soul music and how its music producers and arrangers came to utilise the styles of soul music being made in other cities of the US and to adapt them to the rhythms and approaches that made New Orleans so different to every other soul city USA.

    These CDs are also a tribute to the little labels, whose sound became the heartbeat of the city, playing out onto the streets from jukeboxes, radio stations and mom-and-pop stores selling a few 45s as a sideline. Most of the tracks on these CDs have never been released since the day that the vinyl was first stamped. This is New Orleans African-American music at its most potent. The sound of the young of the city as they heard it and played it two generations ago. RANDB052 You could drop the coin on any disc at random hear something hot. Fred Rothwell Blues & Rhythm With this latest History Of Soul release, New Orleans music fans should be in seventh heaven. David Cole Soul Basement (shipped with booklet and CD inlays but without jewel case to cut down on foreign postage)