Ronnie Scott

  • As the UK fired up to the 'White Heat' predicted by its new Prime Minister Harold Wilson, the nation's jazz scene was already aglow with talent, both established and up and coming. Indeed, London was a boiling crucible of jazz invention, mixing R&B, Hard Bop and a pinch of the Avant-Garde to forge its very own alchemic brand of jazz. Soho Scene '64/'65 captures this moment perfectly, a time when The Beatles and Bond were both new and fresh and when Brit-Jazz sounded as colourful and swinging as anything sashaying down Carnaby Street. Booklet notes by Simon Spillett RANDB058 I love this series. Since every track is different, dynamic and tasty, you can listen straight through without ever looking up… Where American big-band jazz trailed off in the early 1960s Britain continued to develop the genre further and with gusto… the U.S. sides are funky and off the beaten path, making for a wonderful juxtaposition between jazz evolution in London and the U.S. during the exact same two-year period. It's all here on this new set and series. Grab your Lambrettas! Marc Myers Jazzwax.com
    1. Sweet and Lovely
    2. Sweet Lotus Blossom
    3. You Are My Heart’s Delight
    Ronnie Scott (ts); Stan Tracey (p); Rick Laird (b); Ronnie Stephenson (d) BBC Jazz Club, London, February 8th 1965  
    1. Close Your Eyes
    2. Waltz for Debby*
    3. Music That Makes Me Dance/When She Makes Music*
    4. The Night Is Young
    5. I’ll Be Seeing You
    Ronnie Scott (ts); Stan Tracey (p); Freddy Logan (b); Bill Eyden (d); Mark Murphy (vocal*) BBC Jazz Club, London, April 17th 1966  
    1. Close Your Eyes
    2. What’s New?
    3. Avalon
    Ronnie Scott (ts); Stan Tracey (p); Malcolm Cecil (b); Jackie Dougan (d) Free Trade Hall, Manchester, June 6th 1964  
  • 1966-1967. Two years of seismic change in UK history, a time of World Cup wins, of psychedelic 'happenings' and Sgt. Pepper, when London's streets rocked to the sight of mini skirts and Mini Coopers and home-made British pop culture - drawing in everything from satire to sitars - really did look likely to change the world. British jazz was growing too. Having defined itself through the razor-sharp cool of 'modernism', by '66 it was ready to loosen its collar and let its hair down, feeding directly from an anarchic new breed of young musicians able to move between styles as never before, allowing everything from the avant-garde to R&B colour their work. London was now swinging in every direction, like some vast kaleidoscopic merry-go-round. This, then, is the story of those British jazzmen who came along for the ride, some clinging on with white-knuckles and gritted teeth, others enjoying the trip of their lives. Booklet notes by Simon Spillett RANDB062 The set is magnificent… serves as a wonderful bridge spanning the Atlantic, pulling the two jazz cultures together. The Brit-jazz tracks in '66 are sensational. One after the next is rich with energy, power and guile as groups such as the Michael Garrick Sextet, the Stan Tracey Quartet, the Don Rendell/Ian Carr Quintet and Gordon Beck Trio tear neatly into originals. The American tracks from the same year are largely little-known jazz-funk and soul-jazz pieces. The set is smartly curated... All have locked-in grooves and are tasty. The 1967 material is even stronger…And yes, every single track is outrageously excellent. There's no filler here. And the sound is very good. I'll be listening to this set several additional times between now and the end of the weekend. Once again, a superb job by R&B Records. Hats off to the set's producer/editor. Great choices all. Mark Myers Jazz Wax
  • As the UK fired up to the 'White Heat' predicted by its new Prime Minister Harold Wilson, the nation's jazz scene was already aglow with talent, both established and up and coming. Indeed, London was a boiling crucible of jazz invention, mixing R&B, Hard Bop and a pinch of the Avant-Garde to forge its very own alchemic brand of jazz. Soho Scene '64/'65 captures this moment perfectly, a time when The Beatles and Bond were both new and fresh and when Brit-Jazz sounded as colourful and swinging as anything sashaying down Carnaby Street. Booklet notes by Simon Spillett RANDB058 I love this series. Since every track is different, dynamic and tasty, you can listen straight through without ever looking up… Where American big-band jazz trailed off in the early 1960s Britain continued to develop the genre further and with gusto… the U.S. sides are funky and off the beaten path, making for a wonderful juxtaposition between jazz evolution in London and the U.S. during the exact same two-year period. It's all here on this new set and series. Grab your Lambrettas! Marc Myers Jazzwax.com