British Beat/Blues CDs

    1. Around And Around
    2. Off The Hook
    3. Time Is On My Side
    4. It's All Over Now
    5. I'm Alright
    6. Let's Get Together
    7. Carol
    8. Not Fade Away
    9. Carol
    10. Mona
    11. Not Fade Away
    12. High Heel Sneakers
    13. I Just Want To Make Love To You
    14. Ad Break – Rice Krispies
    15. I Wanna Be Your Man
    16. You Better Move On
    17. Roll Over Beethoven
    18. Beautiful Delilah
    19. Around And Around
    20. Time Is on My Side
    21. Not Fade Away
    22. I Just Want To Make Love To You
    23. I'm Alright
    24. I Just Want To Make Love To You
    25. Not Fade Away
    26. Not Fade Away (take 1)
    27. Beautiful Delilah
    28. Walking The Dog
    29. High Heel Sneakers
    30. Susie Q
    31. Mona
    32. High Heel Sneakers/Not Fade Away
    33. I'm Movin' On
  • Disc One
    1. Introduction & Interview
    2. Saturday Night Fish Fry
    3. Interview on arrangements
    4. Yeh Yeh (1)
    5. Preach And Teach
    6. Interview on being #1
    7. Yeh Yeh (2)
    8. Tell All The World About You
    9. Let The Sunshine In
    10. Interview on success in USA
    11. In The Meantime (1)
    12. Point Of No Return (1)
    13. Telegram
    14. Yeh Yeh (3)
    15. Interview on Johnny Burch
    16. In The Meantime (2)
    17. Get On The Right Track, Baby
    18. Interview on the follow up
    19. Like We Used To Be (1)
    20. Rockin‘ Pneumonia Boogie Woogie Flu
    21. No No
    22. Move It On Over
    23. Interview on dancing
    24. Like We Used To Be (2)
    25. Monkeying Around
    26. Point Of No Return (2)
    27. Interview on John Mayall
    28. Something
    29. Ride Your Pony
    30. The World Is Round
    31. Interview on jazz
    32. My Girl
    33. Boot-leg
     
    Disc Two
    1. Interview on Sweet Thing
    2. Sweet Thing (1)
    3. Funny How Time Slips Away
    4. See-Saw
    5. Uptight
    6. Interview with Lulu
    7. Call Me
    8. You'll Never Leave Him
    9. Interview on Get Away
    10. Get Away (1)
    11. Last Night
    12. Close The Door
    13. Interview on going to USA
    14. Get Away (2)
    15. Sweet Thing (2)
    16. Sunny (1)
    17. Interview on Sound Venture
    18. Dawn Yawn
    19. Lovey Dovey
    20. Papa’s Got A Brand New Bag
    21. Interview on Harry South
    22. Keep Your Big Mouth Shut
    23. Three Blind Mice
    24. Do The Dog
    25. Interview on end of the Blue Flames
    26. Because I Love You
    27. Point Of No Return (3)
    28. Waiting Time
    29. Interview on New York
    30. El Pussycat
    31. Sunny (2)
     
  • The Weekend Starts Here That was the invite we got when we tuned in to the best music show in the UK, nay, in the world every Friday evening from August 9, 1963 to December 23, 1966. The CD you have in your hands contains 13 tracks from the Animals on RSG, 27 tracks taken off US TV, 9 tracks from French radio, and an interview with Eric Burdon. 3 tracks from August ’65 are by The Animals Big Band; the boys supplementing their stage presence with a brass section - no British band had ever before sounded this close to an American black jump blues outfit. While The Complete Live Broadcasts I zeroed in on the songs, this set captures much of the atmosphere of the group’s live performances. The Animals created dozens of superb tracks across their singles, EP’s and albums between 1964 and 1966 but the best way to experience the group was live. This set is the nearest equivalent to actually being there. Dave Stephens RANDB061
  • Out of stock

    Rhythm & Blues Records presents a new series of double CDs highlighting the 240 or so songs most frequently performed by British beat and blues artists. Volume One spotlights the pre-Beatles skiffle and folk era and ties this in to the Blues Boom group material of the late 1960s. Three further volumes concentrate on Merseybeat, the London scene and the jazz and soul sounds that influenced the mod movement. In the late 1960s, when US college youth were likely to buy anything British labelled ‘heavy', ‘progressive' or  ‘blues', the brand-leaders of the British Invasion: The Rolling Stones, Fleetwood Mac, Cream, Ten Years After, The Jeff Beck Group and Led Zeppelin were, without exception, born out of the American music included in this fascinating collection.

    Teenagers in post-war America weren't particularly fond of folk, blues or country and western; that was the stuff that their parents liked. Yet to some of their counterparts in ration-book Britain, this music seemed to offer messages from an intriguing culture half a world away. Lonnie Donegan's hit album 'King of Skiffle' engendered a craze among British teenagers for reproducing and even recording these sounds in their suburban bedrooms or provincial youth clubs, on cheap guitars and homemade instruments. The skiffle sound spread like wildfire across the UK before its more discerning practitioners reverted, towards a more rock 'n' roll style, taking their fusion back to North America whence it had come, in a 'British Invasion'.

    R014

  • Out of stock

    Rhythm & Blues Records presents a new series of double CDs highlighting the 240 or so songs most frequently performed by British beat and blues artists. Volume One spotlights the pre-Beatles skiffle and folk era and ties this in to the Blues Boom group material of the late 1960s. Three further volumes concentrate on Merseybeat, the London scene and the jazz and soul sounds that influenced the mod movement. In the late 1960s, when US college youth were likely to buy anything British labelled ‘heavy', ‘progressive' or  ‘blues', the brand-leaders of the British Invasion: The Rolling Stones, Fleetwood Mac, Cream, Ten Years After, The Jeff Beck Group and Led Zeppelin were, without exception, born out of the American music included in this fascinating collection.

    Teenagers in post-war America weren't particularly fond of folk, blues or country and western; that was the stuff that their parents liked. Yet to some of their counterparts in ration-book Britain, this music seemed to offer messages from an intriguing culture half a world away. Lonnie Donegan's hit album 'King of Skiffle' engendered a craze among British teenagers for reproducing and even recording these sounds in their suburban bedrooms or provincial youth clubs, on cheap guitars and homemade instruments. The skiffle sound spread like wildfire across the UK before its more discerning practitioners reverted, towards a more rock 'n' roll style, taking their fusion back to North America whence it had come, in a 'British Invasion'.

    R013

  • Rhythm & Blues Records presents a new series of double CDs highlighting the 240 or so songs most frequently performed by British beat and blues artists. Volume One spotlights the pre-Beatles skiffle and folk era and ties this in to the Blues Boom group material of the late 1960s. Three further volumes concentrate on Merseybeat, the London scene and the jazz and soul sounds that influenced the mod movement. In the late 1960s, when US college youth were likely to buy anything British labelled ‘heavy', ‘progressive' or  ‘blues', the brand-leaders of the British Invasion: The Rolling Stones, Fleetwood Mac, Cream, Ten Years After, The Jeff Beck Group and Led Zeppelin were, without exception, born out of the American music included in this fascinating collection.

    Teenagers in post-war America weren't particularly fond of folk, blues or country and western; that was the stuff that their parents liked. Yet to some of their counterparts in ration-book Britain, this music seemed to offer messages from an intriguing culture half a world away. Lonnie Donegan's hit album 'King of Skiffle' engendered a craze among British teenagers for reproducing and even recording these sounds in their suburban bedrooms or provincial youth clubs, on cheap guitars and homemade instruments. The skiffle sound spread like wildfire across the UK before its more discerning practitioners reverted, towards a more rock 'n' roll style, taking their fusion back to North America whence it had come, in a 'British Invasion'.

    R006

  • Out of stock

    Rhythm & Blues Records presents a new series of double CDs highlighting the 240 or so songs most frequently performed by British beat and blues artists. Volume One spotlights the pre-Beatles skiffle and folk era and ties this in to the Blues Boom group material of the late 1960s. Three further volumes concentrate on Merseybeat, the London scene and the jazz and soul sounds that influenced the mod movement. In the late 1960s, when US college youth were likely to buy anything British labelled ‘heavy', ‘progressive' or  ‘blues', the brand-leaders of the British Invasion: The Rolling Stones, Fleetwood Mac, Cream, Ten Years After, The Jeff Beck Group and Led Zeppelin were, without exception, born out of the American music included in this fascinating collection.

    Teenagers in post-war America weren't particularly fond of folk, blues or country and western; that was the stuff that their parents liked. Yet to some of their counterparts in ration-book Britain, this music seemed to offer messages from an intriguing culture half a world away. Lonnie Donegan's hit album 'King of Skiffle' engendered a craze among British teenagers for reproducing and even recording these sounds in their suburban bedrooms or provincial youth clubs, on cheap guitars and homemade instruments. The skiffle sound spread like wildfire across the UK before its more discerning practitioners reverted, towards a more rock 'n' roll style, taking their fusion back to North America whence it had come, in a 'British Invasion'.

    R005

  • Rhythm & Blues Records presents a new series of double CDs highlighting the 240 or so songs most frequently performed by British beat and blues artists. Volume One spotlights the pre-Beatles skiffle and folk era and ties this in to the Blues Boom group material of the late 1960s. Three further volumes concentrate on Merseybeat, the London scene and the jazz and soul sounds that influenced the mod movement. In the late 1960s, when US college youth were likely to buy anything British labelled ‘heavy', ‘progressive' or  ‘blues', the brand-leaders of the British Invasion: The Rolling Stones, Fleetwood Mac, Cream, Ten Years After, The Jeff Beck Group and Led Zeppelin were, without exception, born out of the American music included in this fascinating collection.

    Teenagers in post-war America weren't particularly fond of folk, blues or country and western; that was the stuff that their parents liked. Yet to some of their counterparts in ration-book Britain, this music seemed to offer messages from an intriguing culture half a world away. Lonnie Donegan's hit album 'King of Skiffle' engendered a craze among British teenagers for reproducing and even recording these sounds in their suburban bedrooms or provincial youth clubs, on cheap guitars and homemade instruments. The skiffle sound spread like wildfire across the UK before its more discerning practitioners reverted, towards a more rock 'n' roll style, taking their fusion back to North America whence it had come, in a 'British Invasion'.

    R016

  • Out of stock
    We know that the Stones built their early career on songs originally performed by The Holy Trinity - Chuck Berry, Bo Diddley and Jimmy Reed. But did you know that the Stones also performed songs made famous by Elvis Presley, Ritchie Valens and the Shadows? It’s all here – fully documented and sounding terrific. We focus on the seminal years 1962- 1965 as the Stones evolved from duplicating the music made by their American idols and start to give it their own distinctive treatment. Even after fifty years these 27 tracks tells us a lot about the musical DNA of the Rolling Stones. Dig in! A series of CDs analysing the songs and styles that inspired the Rolling Stones with fully illustrated 24-page booklet. RANDB056
  • Out of stock
    We know that the Stones built their early career on songs originally performed by The Holy Trinity - Chuck Berry, Bo Diddley and Jimmy Reed. But did you know that the Stones also performed songs made famous by Elvis Presley, Ritchie Valens and the Shadows? It’s all here – fully documented and sounding terrific. We focus on the seminal years 1962- 1965 as the Stones evolved from duplicating the music made by their American idols and start to give it their own distinctive treatment. Even after fifty years these 27 tracks tells us a lot about the musical DNA of the Rolling Stones. Dig in! A series of CDs analysing the songs and styles that inspired the Rolling Stones with fully illustrated 24-page booklet. R007
  • Sale!

    WHO BEGINNINGS Vol1

    £3.00
    Pete Townshend might have been the most articulate songwriter of his generation but like every other band of their era , The Who cut their teeth on cover versions which influenced how their sound developed. From their first gigs The Who were open to a wide range of influences including rhythm and blues, soul, country, jazz, surf, rock ’n’ roll and classical. And it’s all here, in great sound and with a full explanation of what every track meant to The Who. At least three of the cover versions in this collection subsequently mutated into “originals” - see if you can spot them! This CD analyses the songs and styles that inspired The Who and includes a fully illustrated 24-page booklet. R009
  • For too long the Stones covers CD has been the province of freebie magazine cover-mounts and shoddy garage cheapies. No more. Because Rhythm And Blues Records are Doing It Right. Following on from their well-received compilations covering the roots of rock’n’roll the R And B team shine a spotlight on the songs that shaped the Rolling Stones. Volume One covers 1962-1964, documenting how Little Blue Boy and the Blue Boys became first the Rollin’ Stones and then the Rolling Stones we know and love today. The journey takes us from reel-to-reel recordings in suburban front rooms via primitive London studios with egg-box soundproofing to the legendary Chess studios in Chicago. This compilation highlights the cover versions responsible for shaping the Stones sound, then and now. Over twenty-five songs this CD features seminal artists such as Chuck Berry, Muddy Waters, Jimmy Reed, Bo Diddley, Slim Harpo and Big Bill Broonzy as well as the lesser known Tampa Red, Will Bradley and Jazz Gillum. All tracks have been carefully remastered to optimise the sound. An extensively illustrated 28 page booklet features detailed sleevenotes from compilers Nick Duckett and Simon Wright, including a track-by-track commentary and an essay explaining the significance of each song to the Rolling Stones. This is taken from the Introduction: 'The Stones started off as skinny white boys playing music written mostly by old black men. Forty-seven years later, covers are still essential to the Stones, both live and on record - even on the last few tours covers have been played respectfully, partly as public recognition of the bands roots but also because the Stones still enjoy playing the songs they grew up with. The Stones play classic R’n’B with an authority and rhythmic drive no other band has ever consistently matched - in Keith Richard's words they have both the rock and the roll. In recent years the Stones have even featured guests such as John Lee Hooker and Buddy Guy on high profile live dates. Here is a band that pays its dues.' RANDB005
  • Out of stock
    The Kinks emerged from the musical activities of brothers Ray and Dave Davies, born three years apart and raised in Muswell Hill, London. Their first musical incarnation was the Ray Davies Quartet, formed around 1960 with schoolmate Pete Quaife, and this line up, with various drummers, performed blues, folk and jazz at pubs and coffee houses mainly in the north London area. Guitar instrumentals, R&B and rock’n’roll songs were added to the set list as the band went through frequent name changes. This CD is a collection of the songs that were most influential on the sound of the early Kinks and is representative of the live repertoire of the band from the time immediately prior to their signing a recording contract with Pye Records in January 1964. The illustrated 24-page booklet includes essays by Doug Hinman and Nick Duckett and explains the relevance of each track to The Kinks. R008
  • Sale!
    da DAH DAH da DAH da DAH DAH da DAH Possibly the most exciting riff in rock history; raw, dirty and totally infectious. You Really Got Me was a landmark recording: a breakthrough in sound that has echoed throughdozens of rock classics and become the blueprint for hard rock, heavy metal even, while its sloppy guitar solo pointed the way for punk rock. No rock band is an island. The Kinks started writing at one of the most exciting times in popular music, when youngsters were hungry for new and obscure discs, mixing it up, learning all the time, trying it out in their front rooms. Here is the story of You Really Got Me. CD One tells the story of this seminal record and charts its influences, some of them surprising. CD Two presents original versions of Kinks stage favourites. RANDB033
  • CD1 KINKS BEGINNINGS 1 CD2 STORY OF A SONG CD3 KINKS BEGINNINGS 2 ‘I advise you to listen with the liner notes handy' Doug Hinman This CD set presents on two discs, the songs that were most influential on the sound of the early Kinks and also the original versions of those songs the group have played in concert over the years. The additional disc focuses on recordings which influenced the creation of You Really Got Me. Two illustrated 24-page booklets include essays by Doug Hinman and Nick Duckett and explain the relevance of each track to The Kinks. RANDB046
  • In 1965, there were two types of group in the UK: those influenced strongly by the Beatles, and those whose raison d'être was American blues and R&B. In part this split would have come about because of the pioneering blues work from Alexis Korner and Cyril Davies, who were both London based. Newcastle’s Animals and Belfast’s Them were the two biggest exceptions. Among the highlights of this CD set are the Animals’ contributions to a Granada TV show “Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On”. Check out the clip on the net - the camera sweeps across and Eric kicks into the a cappella intro to “Talkin’ ‘Bout You” supported only by hand clapping; there’s a flourish from Alan Price’s Vox and they’re off. Elsewhere the boys conjure up images of people like Pinetop Perkins via Ray Charles’ early classic “Mess Around”; they give us their take on the much recorded “See See Rider” which doesn’t owe a debt to anyone; and they deliver a swinging ”I Got To Find My Baby” with plenty of ad hoc extras from Eric. Several of those great hit singles (plus a flip plus some LP tracks) are here too, all benefitting from full “road testing”; Hooker’s “Boom Boom” is a stand -out with mood switching between intimacy and all out rocking. Round about the time the Animals‘ first single was released, I saw the band perform in one of those Central London clubs you have to go downstairs to reach. They were the toughest of the British R&B Groups. They were the real thing. Dave Stephens RANDB057 Produced as CD-R (professionally manufactured recordable CD printed for short run) as opposed to CD-P (professionally manufactured pressed CDs made in quantities of 500+). All CDs whether CD-R or CD-P are 100% guaranteed error free. Discs will always be replaced if any problems are encountered. 24-page booklet included