Rumba

  • This little gem… the extensive, well-written accompanying notes could usefully be used by anyone lecturing on the subjects. Brian Smith R2 If this collection doesn’t put an umbrella in your pina colada then you should see a doctor. There’s the genuinely hard-core instrumental Latin gems bristling with brass such as the Griffin Brothers with Griff’s Mambo, and Illinois Jacquet’s terrific sexy sax on Mambocito Mio. And if you’re thinking this might be all snake hips and exotic women’s hats piled with fruit, there are even Latin tracks from Chuck Berry, Howlin’ Wolf and Elmore James. As a collection to dance to, this is a brilliant idea. Olé! Git down and boogie…er…mambo. Blues Matters RANDB012
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    Africa and Latin America together have moulded American popular music since the beginning of the twentieth century. African influences have led to the development of jazz, gospel and blues while successive waves of dance music from Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Cuba, Puerto Rico and Jamaica have largely determined its rhythm. Dance forms and musical stylings such as habanera, bolero, tango, rumba, conga, samba, baion, calypso, mambo, charleston, cha-cha-cha, bossa nova and twistall have their origins outside the USA. This compilation aims to demonstrate just how far back the roots of Latin jazz stretch, well beyond the partnership that Dizzy Gillespie forged with Chano Pozo in founding cubop, the post-war marriage of bebop with Cuban music. RANDB009
  • This little gem… the extensive, well-written accompanying notes could usefully be used by anyone lecturing on the subjects. Brian Smith R2 If this collection doesn’t put an umbrella in your pina colada then you should see a doctor. There’s the genuinely hard-core instrumental Latin gems bristling with brass such as the Griffin Brothers with Griff’s Mambo, and Illinois Jacquet’s terrific sexy sax on Mambocito Mio. And if you’re thinking this might be all snake hips and exotic women’s hats piled with fruit, there are even Latin tracks from Chuck Berry, Howlin’ Wolf and Elmore James. As a collection to dance to, this is a brilliant idea. Olé! Git down and boogie…er…mambo. Blues Matters RANDB012
  • This is slippery and seductive music with that tricky undercurrrent that rumba beats bring, and to hear how these diverse musicians adapted and bent it to their own styles is just a whole heap of fun. More than that though, if you take the time to read the liner note essay, this collection is instructive history. But history that will put a smile on your face and dip in your step. Elsewhere.co.nz I thoroughly recommend this one…all tracks are pretty great…a really excellent compilation…contains tracks you wouldn’t necessarily associate with latin music…it messes together very, very well. Mark Lamarr BBC Radio 2 RANDB010
  • This is a delicious 2CD production with a 28-page booklet choked with information, pictures (the Earl Palmer one is terrific) and a discography that indicates the rhythm pattern associated with the song. The appendix gives instruction on how to speak aloud the rhythm of the beats and tap out the accented beats with your hands (difficult or what?)...Let me assure you on the majority of tracks my foot jumps and I want to dance...The tracks do not appear to be common to the vast amount of PD releases...CD 2 is very interesting with a different feel to your normal run of the mill PD...due to their late 50s/early 60s recording dates...It’s the more obscure tracks...that grab you...The number one and most essential is the quality of the recordings. They are first class and on a personal note, I now have the best copy in my collection of ‘The Freeze’ by Albert Collins. There is a lot to discover and long established collectors will have the opportunity to refresh their musical diet by checking this compilation out. Highly recommended to all. Keith Scoffham Blues & Rhythm R012
  • 'This compilation shows how Latin music's irresistible rhythms first took hold of the blues and brought teenagers black and white on to the dance floor'. RANDB026
  • The mambo was born in Cuba in 1938, of African and European parentage. It arrived in New York ten years later via Havana and Mexico City. 1954 was the year of the mambo in America as dancers flocked to the ballrooms to see exciting new bands led by Machito, Tito Puente, Perez Prado and Tito Rodriguez. To cash in on the craze, record companies encouraged their R&B artists to come up with songs in a Latin vein and to include the word mambo in the title. Latin rhythms have infiltrated every branch of popular music, but none has had such a wide ranging influence as the rumba. Its 3-3-2 rhythm, combined with the New Orleans second line beat, formed the basis of the Stax and Motown sound and the more complex rhythms of funk in the 1960s. RANDB041