R&B CDs

  • The History of Rhythm and Blues series of CDs brings you the accidental synthesis of jazz, gospel, blues, ragtime, country, pop and Latin into a definable form of black music, which would influence pretty well all popular music from the 1950s to the present. It is the first attempt to put together a cross-label compilation showcasing the most important and influential records in the rise of Rhythm & Blues. RANDB002
  • 36 Page illustrated booklet.

    By the beginning of 1963, African-American music in New Orleans was in flux. Its happy-go-lucky R & B sound was no longer guaranteed to hit the national charts. In short, the good times in the city had run out of steam. The major issue now was what sort of music to record in the wake of the “British Invasion”. The answer of course was “soul”. Until soul became the ubiquitous African-American musical style, the music that was recorded in the city was a Louisiana gumbo of blues, R & B, gospel, swamp pop, anything and everything that might sell a few records.

    This set of CDs is the story of how one city, New Orleans, with its unique, proud and energetic history came to adopt soul music and how its music producers and arrangers came to utilise the styles of soul music being made in other cities of the US and to adapt them to the rhythms and approaches that made New Orleans so different to every other soul city USA.

    These CDs are also a tribute to the little labels, whose sound became the heartbeat of the city, playing out onto the streets from jukeboxes, radio stations and mom-and-pop stores selling a few 45s as a sideline. Most of the tracks on these CDs have never been released since the day that the vinyl was first stamped. This is New Orleans African-American music at its most potent. The sound of the young of the city as they heard it and played it two generations ago. RANDB052
  • Out of stock

    Instrumentals Soul-Style? What do you mean Soul Instrumentals? How can an instrumental be soul? Hold on a minute - what's the line-up? James Brown, Ray Charles, Allen Toussaint, Junior Walker, Booker T & the MGs, King Curtis, Ike & Tina Turner. What have we got here? Club Sounds. A bit of funk, a Latin groove, a slow jazz walk, uptown dancers, late night smoochers. Instrumentals Soul-Style. Got it?

    Now here’s a crackerjack of a compilation with a lot of relatively rare instrumentals of a soul bias alongside many genre classics. It’s February as I write these notes but already this must be a contender for best compilation of the year. Davy Peckett New Gandy Dancer

    This is a wisely selected, carefully sequenced and beautifully presented collection of late 50s/early 60s instrumentals with a soulful feel and fronts an informative and attractive 28-page booklet. You’re really going to enjoy this. And the great thing is that apart from making several wonderful new finds, this is such a superb album for listening right through. Anyone who has any of the History of R&B or History of Soul label releases will be well aware of their quality and the care that goes into them and Instrumentals Soul-Style is a real gem for instrumental hounds – I love it! Alan Taylor Pipeline

    SOUL012  
  • Instrumentals Soul-Style

    Club Sounds, a bit of funk, a Latin groove, a slow jazz walk, uptown dancers, late night smoochers. Plenty of organ. Plenty of soul. No twangy guitar. No swing jazz. No frantic honkin' and screamin'. Just Instrumentals Soul-Style.

    SOUL028  
  • Rhythm & Blues Records presents a new series of double CDs highlighting the 240 or so songs most frequently performed by British beat and blues artists. Volume One spotlights the pre-Beatles skiffle and folk era and ties this in to the Blues Boom group material of the late 1960s. Three further volumes concentrate on Merseybeat, the London scene and the jazz and soul sounds that influenced the mod movement. In the late 1960s, when US college youth were likely to buy anything British labelled ‘heavy', ‘progressive' or  ‘blues', the brand-leaders of the British Invasion: The Rolling Stones, Fleetwood Mac, Cream, Ten Years After, The Jeff Beck Group and Led Zeppelin were, without exception, born out of the American music included in this fascinating collection.

    Teenagers in post-war America weren't particularly fond of folk, blues or country and western; that was the stuff that their parents liked. Yet to some of their counterparts in ration-book Britain, this music seemed to offer messages from an intriguing culture half a world away. Lonnie Donegan's hit album 'King of Skiffle' engendered a craze among British teenagers for reproducing and even recording these sounds in their suburban bedrooms or provincial youth clubs, on cheap guitars and homemade instruments. The skiffle sound spread like wildfire across the UK before its more discerning practitioners reverted, towards a more rock 'n' roll style, taking their fusion back to North America whence it had come, in a 'British Invasion'.

    R014

  • Rhythm & Blues Records presents a new series of double CDs highlighting the 240 or so songs most frequently performed by British beat and blues artists. Volume One spotlights the pre-Beatles skiffle and folk era and ties this in to the Blues Boom group material of the late 1960s. Three further volumes concentrate on Merseybeat, the London scene and the jazz and soul sounds that influenced the mod movement. In the late 1960s, when US college youth were likely to buy anything British labelled ‘heavy', ‘progressive' or  ‘blues', the brand-leaders of the British Invasion: The Rolling Stones, Fleetwood Mac, Cream, Ten Years After, The Jeff Beck Group and Led Zeppelin were, without exception, born out of the American music included in this fascinating collection.

    Teenagers in post-war America weren't particularly fond of folk, blues or country and western; that was the stuff that their parents liked. Yet to some of their counterparts in ration-book Britain, this music seemed to offer messages from an intriguing culture half a world away. Lonnie Donegan's hit album 'King of Skiffle' engendered a craze among British teenagers for reproducing and even recording these sounds in their suburban bedrooms or provincial youth clubs, on cheap guitars and homemade instruments. The skiffle sound spread like wildfire across the UK before its more discerning practitioners reverted, towards a more rock 'n' roll style, taking their fusion back to North America whence it had come, in a 'British Invasion'.

    R013

  • Rhythm & Blues Records presents a new series of double CDs highlighting the 240 or so songs most frequently performed by British beat and blues artists. Volume One spotlights the pre-Beatles skiffle and folk era and ties this in to the Blues Boom group material of the late 1960s. Three further volumes concentrate on Merseybeat, the London scene and the jazz and soul sounds that influenced the mod movement. In the late 1960s, when US college youth were likely to buy anything British labelled ‘heavy', ‘progressive' or  ‘blues', the brand-leaders of the British Invasion: The Rolling Stones, Fleetwood Mac, Cream, Ten Years After, The Jeff Beck Group and Led Zeppelin were, without exception, born out of the American music included in this fascinating collection.

    Teenagers in post-war America weren't particularly fond of folk, blues or country and western; that was the stuff that their parents liked. Yet to some of their counterparts in ration-book Britain, this music seemed to offer messages from an intriguing culture half a world away. Lonnie Donegan's hit album 'King of Skiffle' engendered a craze among British teenagers for reproducing and even recording these sounds in their suburban bedrooms or provincial youth clubs, on cheap guitars and homemade instruments. The skiffle sound spread like wildfire across the UK before its more discerning practitioners reverted, towards a more rock 'n' roll style, taking their fusion back to North America whence it had come, in a 'British Invasion'.

    R006

  • Rhythm & Blues Records presents a new series of double CDs highlighting the 240 or so songs most frequently performed by British beat and blues artists. Volume One spotlights the pre-Beatles skiffle and folk era and ties this in to the Blues Boom group material of the late 1960s. Three further volumes concentrate on Merseybeat, the London scene and the jazz and soul sounds that influenced the mod movement. In the late 1960s, when US college youth were likely to buy anything British labelled ‘heavy', ‘progressive' or  ‘blues', the brand-leaders of the British Invasion: The Rolling Stones, Fleetwood Mac, Cream, Ten Years After, The Jeff Beck Group and Led Zeppelin were, without exception, born out of the American music included in this fascinating collection.

    Teenagers in post-war America weren't particularly fond of folk, blues or country and western; that was the stuff that their parents liked. Yet to some of their counterparts in ration-book Britain, this music seemed to offer messages from an intriguing culture half a world away. Lonnie Donegan's hit album 'King of Skiffle' engendered a craze among British teenagers for reproducing and even recording these sounds in their suburban bedrooms or provincial youth clubs, on cheap guitars and homemade instruments. The skiffle sound spread like wildfire across the UK before its more discerning practitioners reverted, towards a more rock 'n' roll style, taking their fusion back to North America whence it had come, in a 'British Invasion'.

    R005

  • Rhythm & Blues Records presents a new series of double CDs highlighting the 240 or so songs most frequently performed by British beat and blues artists. Volume One spotlights the pre-Beatles skiffle and folk era and ties this in to the Blues Boom group material of the late 1960s. Three further volumes concentrate on Merseybeat, the London scene and the jazz and soul sounds that influenced the mod movement. In the late 1960s, when US college youth were likely to buy anything British labelled ‘heavy', ‘progressive' or  ‘blues', the brand-leaders of the British Invasion: The Rolling Stones, Fleetwood Mac, Cream, Ten Years After, The Jeff Beck Group and Led Zeppelin were, without exception, born out of the American music included in this fascinating collection.

    Teenagers in post-war America weren't particularly fond of folk, blues or country and western; that was the stuff that their parents liked. Yet to some of their counterparts in ration-book Britain, this music seemed to offer messages from an intriguing culture half a world away. Lonnie Donegan's hit album 'King of Skiffle' engendered a craze among British teenagers for reproducing and even recording these sounds in their suburban bedrooms or provincial youth clubs, on cheap guitars and homemade instruments. The skiffle sound spread like wildfire across the UK before its more discerning practitioners reverted, towards a more rock 'n' roll style, taking their fusion back to North America whence it had come, in a 'British Invasion'.

    R016

  • Manchester Free Trade Hall was host to two concerts on Sunday October 21st 1962 that acted as a catalyst to the nascent British Blues & R&B boom, on the verge of breaking out of its suburban home in Ealing, West London. The shows were promoted by Stockport-based Paddy MacKiernan under the Jazz Unlimited banner and attracted a crowd of around two thousand enthusiasts, who saw the first major concert in Britain to feature American bluesmen. Manchester was the only UK date on the 1962 American Folk-Blues Festival tour and it was attended by blues fans from all over the country through what Paul Jones called ‘the bush telegraph’. With Jones were Alexis Korner and Macclesfield-born John Mayall, plus extraordinarily a contingent of younger fans who had made the trip in a clapped out van from London. Why extraordinary? Because the van contained some of the future superstars of the British scene: Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Brian Jones and Jimmy Page. The Stones by this time had just a dozen gigs under their belts and Page had recently embarked on the first stage of his career as a session guitarist. David Williams dedicates a whole chapter to the road trip in his book The First Time We Met The Blues. “It must have been around early September 1962 when news filtered down the grapevine…We could hardly believe that real blues artists were going to appear here in our country…were regarded somewhat like mystic gods within our circle…(Jimmy Page) realised that he would not be able to make the journey with us as he was already booked to play a gig with Neil Christian on the Saturday night…it was agreed Jim would travel up by train on the Sunday and we would find space for him in the van for the journey back overnight…Graham (Ackers) was a pretty good driver and soon managed to find his way through Central London to a square ...where we picked up Mick, Keith and Brian.” Keith Richards remembers it differently, “Mick sometimes had the use of his parents’ Triumph Herald at the weekend and I remember we went to see a big blues show in Manchester.” Jimmy Page: “When David Williams told me of the impending visit of the initial American Folk-Blues Festival to England, I was keen to join the pilgrimage to Manchester. It was not only the first time that I would actually see artists like John Lee Hooker and T-Bone Walker perform, but it was also the first time I met Mick Jagger, Brian Jones and Keith Richards, who came with us on the trip. We were all like-minded enthusiasts and in those days we regarded the artists we were going to see as idols.” ABC TV filmed the second show and broadcast it in two parts for its Tempo programme. The recordings (from the Newby collection) are of excellent sound quality and were taken off air by direct line into a Tandberg reel to reel recorder. RANDB059
  • New Orleans.... home of jazz, birthplace of the funk and, some would say, of rock'n'roll. No great controversy there, but The Big Easy's role in the history of soul music has been less well documented. Part of the 'History of Soul' series, this compilation of tracks illustrates the depth and breadth of music produced in the city between 1958 and 1962. Music that went way beyond R&B, taking into soul the joyous rhythms of funky second line parade bands, the gospel-based piano triplets of barrelhouse wizards and the tight horn sections of Allen Toussaint and Dave Bartholomew, whose arrangements from would later inform the classic Stax sound. The familiar names are all here: Irma Thomas, Aaron Neville, Eddie Bo, Bobby Marchan but so are the lesser known but fabulous Ray Washington, Berna Dean, Martha Carter and Chuck Carbo. So prepare to be blown away by some of the most exciting, deep and affecting sounds that ever came from Louisiana and made their way into soul as we know it. 'This is an amazing value for the price - SO MANY good songs from some of the best classic New Orleans music artists. I stumbled across this gem looking for Ernie K-Doe and discovered so many amazing hits via this compilation!' Miss Malaprop (New Orleans blogger) SOUL003
  • More than any other city in the world, New Orleans has been responsible for shaping the sound of twentieth century popular music. Sweeping statement that may be, but as the birthplace of jazz, funk and arguably rock’n’roll, it really has no other contenders. At the heart of these three widely different varieties of music lies the rhythmic complexity of second line parade drumming. Its two-beat patterns combining military band and Caribbean rhythms underpin the early recordings of Louis Armstrong as much as they do those of Little Richard and James Brown. This compilation highlights some of the distinguishing characteristics found in early New Orleans recordings, not with the intention of picking out the city’s finest jazz and blues recordings but in order to pinpoint styles that would foreshadow later developments in the rhythm and blues field. 28 page booklet RANDB029