Instrumentals

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    Instrumentals Soul-Style? What do you mean Soul Instrumentals? How can an instrumental be soul? Hold on a minute - what's the line-up? James Brown, Ray Charles, Allen Toussaint, Junior Walker, Booker T & the MGs, King Curtis, Ike & Tina Turner. What have we got here? Club Sounds. A bit of funk, a Latin groove, a slow jazz walk, uptown dancers, late night smoochers. Instrumentals Soul-Style. Got it?

    Now here’s a crackerjack of a compilation with a lot of relatively rare instrumentals of a soul bias alongside many genre classics. It’s February as I write these notes but already this must be a contender for best compilation of the year. Davy Peckett New Gandy Dancer

    This is a wisely selected, carefully sequenced and beautifully presented collection of late 50s/early 60s instrumentals with a soulful feel and fronts an informative and attractive 28-page booklet. You’re really going to enjoy this. And the great thing is that apart from making several wonderful new finds, this is such a superb album for listening right through. Anyone who has any of the History of R&B or History of Soul label releases will be well aware of their quality and the care that goes into them and Instrumentals Soul-Style is a real gem for instrumental hounds – I love it! Alan Taylor Pipeline

    SOUL012  
  • Instrumentals Soul-Style

    Club Sounds, a bit of funk, a Latin groove, a slow jazz walk, uptown dancers, late night smoochers. Plenty of organ. Plenty of soul. No twangy guitar. No swing jazz. No frantic honkin' and screamin'. Just Instrumentals Soul-Style.

    SOUL028  
  • 1960 may have been the year that Instrumentals hit the charts in a big way, but it was in 1961, that their hold on the hit parade was consolidated with a good number of guitar or sax-led rockers and slinky organ groovers. These are the discs that teenagers wanted to hear in the juke joints: exciting, uptempo stompers with catchy, melodic riffs, and slow, soulful, down home blues. Our compilation throws the spotlight on instrumentals by artists who are more widely associated with vocals, along with more obscure musicians who may only have one or two releases to their name. We hope you enjoy these grooves and if you like what you hear from 1961, just wait till you find out what was on offer in 1959, and in 1960! RANDB038
  • 1960 may have been the big year for Instrumentals, but back in 1959, several white instrumentals acts were already making a dent in the pop charts, among them the Virtues, the Rebels, the Rock-A-Teens and the Fireballs. Duane Eddy had broken through in ‘58 but in 1959 he had no less than seven singles on the Hot 100. Johnny & the Hurricanes had their first success this year with three big hits. Black artists, however, had less mainstream success. Jimmy Beck sneaked in at #82 for two weeks with Pipe Dreams, Larry Kerrin’s The Hunch was a hit for both Paul Gayten and the Bobby Peterson Quintet; Bill Doggett had three discs in the R&B charts but apart from a couple of organ hits for Preston Epps and ‘Dave Baby’ Cortez, that was it for R&B instrumentals chart-wise. If you’re knocked out by what you hear from 1959, just wait till you find out what was on offer in 1960 and 1961. RANDB037
  • 1960 was the year that Instrumentals hit the charts in a big way with guitar or sax-led rockers and slinky organ groovers. Here are the discs that teenagers wanted to hear in the juke joints: exciting, uptempo stompers with catchy, melodic riffs, along with slow, soulful, down home blues. This compilation throws the spotlight on instrumentals by artists more widely associated with vocals, along with more obscure artists who may only have had one or two releases to their name. ...absolutely cracking double CD of 57 superb R&B instrumentals from a vintage year...we’ve just finished whipping through it and it’s going on again in 5 minutes! More please! New Gandy Dancer RANDB034
  • Link Wray’s Rumble and Bill Doggett’s Hold It are the only two big hits included on this collection, which puts a deserved spotlight on both long-forgotten records by established artists and on fabulous obscurities by long-forgotten artists. But rest assured, this is a cracking compilation from start to finish, with Southern swamp rock, spicy New Orleans rhythms and Northern city blues. Guitar and sax-led rockers, slinky organ stompers, Latin groovers – all in all, 60 mighty instrumental stompers from 1958, R&B-style. Bonus Disc (Only available if bought direct from us) RANDB045
  • Just before the United States joined the Second World War, Jazz was at a crossroads. Big Band Swing was at the height of its popularity amongst white jazz fans, but black audiences were tiring of the bland, easy listening fare being served up by the likes of Glenn Miller. It was high time to put some excitement back into jazz, and the ‘honkers and screamers’ were in the right place at the right time to do it. Jazz purists hated it, but the public lapped it up. This set brings together all the jazz and R&B instrumentals that reached the R&B charts between 1942 and 1963 and draws a connecting line between Swing, Bebop, Boogie, Jive, Mambo, Rock’n’roll, culminating in the funky organ grooves of Booker T and Jimmy Smith. It still has the irresistible energy that seduced so many in the Forties, Fifties and Sixties and changed the character of popular music forever. We couldn't get all the hits even on to 4 CDs, so there is an extra 2CD set available as a free bonus set only available direct from us. RANDB050
  • Here’s a selection of cracking R&B instrumentals, and scarcely a chart hit amongst them. Guitar-led rockers from the West Coast, with fiery picking and heavy blues/rock riffs from Johnny Talbot, Travis Wammack and Roy Buchanan and some early fuzzbox action from Lou Josie of the Ho-Dads. There’s Louisiana sounds from Mac “Dr. John” Rebennack and Robert Parker with Mid-West guitar grooves by Tommy Tucker, Freddy King and Little Milton. Up in New York, you’ve got B.B. King, Wild Jimmy Spruill, and King Curtis blowing out on Soul Train. Dave Lewis and The Exotics were from Seattle and there’s even a Canadian group, future comedian Tommy Chong’s Little Daddy & The Bachelors. These are the records Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page, Dave Davies, Jeff Beck et al were listening to in 1964. An extra 2CD set is available as a free bonus only if bought direct from us. RANDB053
  • This set brings together the finest R&B instrumentals recorded between 1956 and 1957, putting the spotlight both on long-forgotten records by established artists and fabulous obscurities by long-forgotten ones! It’s a cracking compilation from start to finish: Mid-West electric blues, Southern swamp rock, spicy New Orleans rhythms, sophisticated West-Coast productions and East Coast city blues, dominated by guitarists and saxophonists but interspersed with a few organists, accordionists, pianists, harmonicists and even a unitarist. All in all, 120 mighty instrumental stompers from 1956-57, R&B-style. Glorious stuff! An extra 2CD set is available as a free bonus only if bought direct from us. RANDB054