CDs

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    The black music scene in post war America was dominated by the emerging urban, electrified R&B scene in Chicago. Nearby Detroit was musically dwarfed, with much of its talent being drawn to the Windy City, but as the 50s drew to a close, things began to change. Detroit’s population bulge coincided with the consumer boom, making its age profile younger than its neighbour’s. Thousands of southern black migrants were joined by many immigrants from Europe come to work in the automobile industry. Henry Ford’s pay was good, and with plenty of disposable income available for its inhabitants, Detroit became the goodtime capital of the USA.

    Hundreds of bars, clubs and backroom record labels emerged, hosting a tidal wave of new talent. By 1960, although it was still too early for any definitive Detroit sound to be identifiable, the city was developing a lighter, more popular style than neighbouring Chicago. It was spearheaded by a young man from Gladstone Street, whose distinctive Motown sound went on to dominate the 60s pop charts.

    The tracks on these CDs represent the cream of this transitional pre-Motown era, when various labels, artists and producers were putting out popular music that they hoped might get noticed and sell enough to make them rich and famous. In 1963, Detroit had by far the fastest growing black music industry in the USA, not just recorded music but a live gig scene just as prolific. Back then no one knew that Berry Gordy Jr would emerge victorious and define the Detroit sound for the decade that followed.

    Sit back and enjoy another batch of Detroit gems.

    In the 32 page booklet, each track is given a quarter-page with details of the release plus label shots, period photographs and interesting notes from Keith Rylatt...Overall this is terrific music with great presentation and is a real source for discovery...This compilation should appeal to all readers who have soul in their system... An excellent release and worth investigating. Blues & Rhythm Keith Scoffham

    As with previous History Of Soul product reviewed on this site, the selection has been well thought-out and the presentation is top-notch, appeal here going well beyond the core niche of Detroit devotees.' Basement Group David Cole. STAR PICK*****

    SOUL023
  • The Big Apple had long been an important centre of Afro-American music, following on from its Tin Pan Alley status, and this trend continued after World War Two. Together with large independent labels like Atlantic and Jubilee, smaller labels jostled for sales in a crowded marketplace, recording almost all the black music styles: country blues, city R&B, gospel, doo wop – and everything in between.

    By 1966, soul was the dominant musical genre throughout the US, and New York was THE recording centre, producing more records than anywhere else. This CD avoids the better-known hits, and you may not have heard of a lot of the singers, but these tracks, often from tiny labels, represent the sound of the city rather better than many big label productions. This is the sound from the streets and clubs - music that got heard and appreciated way below the radar.

    We’ve brought together all the branches of the soul tree from funky R&B to sweet group soul, from pounding uptempo dancers to big city cry ballads. There’s something in these grooves for the feet and for the heart – what more could anyone want?

    SOUL030
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    Volume Two 1962-1965 African American popular music was mostly known as Rhythm and Blues in 1962, the beginning of the era covered in this collection. But by the end of the period, 1965, the music was universally called Soul. The Chicago music industry exploded with the growth of soul music in this period, producing thousands of records and dozens and dozens of new labels. The two biggest black music labels Vee-Jay and Chess led in the creation of the Chicago soul brand with names familiar and not so familiar: the former with Etta James and Tony Adams and the latter with Gene Chandler and Moss Tolbert. And yet it's the smaller labels that make up the bulk of the Chicago story: Conlo with Jamo Thomas, Blue Rock with Otis Leaville, Ja-Wes with Sandra Stephens and it's here that we explore some of the finest sounds of the era in this collection.

    SOUL032
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    OHIO SOUL 2CD

    £5.00

    Before the Second World War, the African American population of Ohio was small and concentrated in the southern part of the State, mainly in Cincinnatti; black music recordings from that era in the state are pretty rare. But the great northward migration from the old slave states during and after the war drew large numbers of blacks to the factories of Akron, Dayton and particularly Cleveland. This encouraged musical entrepreneurs to establish independent recording companies in Ohio that produced music for the new populations. The state's powerhouse for music was of course the King label and its subsidiaries run by the iron fist of Syd Nathan in Cincinnati. So it is quite appropriate that this CD set has a preponderance of tracks from this source, and from King's Chicago outpost.

    SOUL026
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    36 Page illustrated booklet.

    By the beginning of 1963, African-American music in New Orleans was in flux. Its happy-go-lucky R & B sound was no longer guaranteed to hit the national charts. In short, the good times in the city had run out of steam. The major issue now was what sort of music to record in the wake of the “British Invasion”. The answer of course was “soul”. Until soul became the ubiquitous African-American musical style, the music that was recorded in the city was a Louisiana gumbo of blues, R & B, gospel, swamp pop, anything and everything that might sell a few records.

    This set of CDs is the story of how one city, New Orleans, with its unique, proud and energetic history came to adopt soul music and how its music producers and arrangers came to utilise the styles of soul music being made in other cities of the US and to adapt them to the rhythms and approaches that made New Orleans so different to every other soul city USA.

    These CDs are also a tribute to the little labels, whose sound became the heartbeat of the city, playing out onto the streets from jukeboxes, radio stations and mom-and-pop stores selling a few 45s as a sideline. Most of the tracks on these CDs have never been released since the day that the vinyl was first stamped. This is New Orleans African-American music at its most potent. The sound of the young of the city as they heard it and played it two generations ago. RANDB052 You could drop the coin on any disc at random hear something hot. Fred Rothwell Blues & Rhythm With this latest History Of Soul release, New Orleans music fans should be in seventh heaven. David Cole Soul Basement
  • Some might think that soul music’s days of chart glory came later, but by the time Ray Charles was anointed High Priest of Soul in 1961, black America’s airwaves were habitually using the term soul to describe a gospelized R&B style that had been producing reliable hits since the late 50s. This collection represents the emergence of that fabulous sound in the charts in New York (the centre of the country’s recording industry), the Midwest (Cincinnati, Detroit, Chicago), the South (Georgia, Memphis, New Orleans, Texas), and the West (Los Angeles).

    'First off I must say that having discovered your compilations earlier this year - both r'n'b and soul - I am completely blown away by the breadth and depth, quality and value of these compilations. They immediately became 'must buys' until your release rate caused me to slow down before I bankrupted myself. Keep up the good work.' Malcolm Beattie (Rnb and Soul fan)

    SOUL018
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    Dance crazes have come and gone in America ever since the roaring twenties, but nothing quite compares to the epidemic of dance fever that hit the USA in the early 60s brought on by the twist and the rise and rise of soul music. The country was infected by wave after wave of catchy dance rhythms, each necessitating new moves on the dance floor. Everybody was getting a bit of that new soul bug! This collection brings you only a small proportion of the 100s and 100s of dance records produced between 1960 and 1965, before the soul industry got away from the promotion of dance records. There may have been dance rages in the next several decades, but nothing else comes even close to the 1960s for its sheer energy and diversity.

    SOUL031
  • BLACK DANCE CRAZES FROM THE LATE 50s & 60s

    The Dance Craze era was at its height in the years 1960-1961-1962 but by 1963 it was beginning to fizzle out. It came at a time when rhythm and blues was losing its appeal amongst black music buyers, who were being attracted more towards the proto-soul sounds coming from Detroit, New York, Chicago and the deep South. But dance music sold records and the nascent soul stars of the era were not slow to pick up on the trend. This CD, part of the ‘History of Soul’ series, set puts a spotlight on dance records predominantly by early soul artists, some of whom went on to bigger things and some of whom didn’t. The accompanying booklet is written by Robert Pruter, author of the acclaimed 'Chicago Soul'.

    'First off I must say that having discovered your compilations earlier this year - both r'n'b and soul - I am completely blown away by the breadth and depth, quality and value of these compilations. They immediately became 'must buys' until your release rate caused me to slow down before I bankrupted myself. Keep up the good work.' Malcolm Beattie (Rnb and Soul fan)

    SOUL006
  • Instrumentals Soul-Style? What do you mean Soul Instrumentals? How can an instrumental be soul? Hold on a minute - what's the line-up? James Brown, Ray Charles, Allen Toussaint, Junior Walker, Booker T & the MGs, King Curtis, Ike & Tina Turner. What have we got here? Club Sounds. A bit of funk, a Latin groove, a slow jazz walk, uptown dancers, late night smoochers. Instrumentals Soul-Style. Got it?

    Now here’s a crackerjack of a compilation with a lot of relatively rare instrumentals of a soul bias alongside many genre classics. It’s February as I write these notes but already this must be a contender for best compilation of the year. Davy Peckett New Gandy Dancer

    This is a wisely selected, carefully sequenced and beautifully presented collection of late 50s/early 60s instrumentals with a soulful feel and fronts an informative and attractive 28-page booklet. You’re really going to enjoy this. And the great thing is that apart from making several wonderful new finds, this is such a superb album for listening right through. Anyone who has any of the History of R&B or History of Soul label releases will be well aware of their quality and the care that goes into them and Instrumentals Soul-Style is a real gem for instrumental hounds – I love it! Alan Taylor Pipeline

    SOUL012  
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    Late night, swinging soul and rockin' blues... Tracks that not only accompanied the dance crazes of the time, but also showcase the essential elements that inspired them. The strong recurring bass riff, four-to-the-floor beat, and blasting horns all influenced the tight choreography of The Temptations in Detroit through to the improvised moves of the dancers in the soul clubs of the midlands and north of England

    SOUL027  
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    Instrumentals Soul-Style

    Club Sounds, a bit of funk, a Latin groove, a slow jazz walk, uptown dancers, late night smoochers. Plenty of organ. Plenty of soul. No twangy guitar. No swing jazz. No frantic honkin' and screamin'. Just Instrumentals Soul-Style.

    SOUL028  
  • 1957-1963

    As Southern Soul reached its Golden Age around 1965-65, it was mining a rich seam of music that went back to blues gospel and country. In our third look at the music that went into Southern Soul, we have unearthed a shining array of rare gems from both male and female singers, who scream, cry and shout out their emotions. This elemental feel to the collection goes hand in hand with stunning arrangements and musicianship that will bring joy to anyone’s heart.

    Soul 002 & 017 Where Southern Soul Began 1 & 2 'These two 2-cd volumes are a fine way to trace the roots of what we now call 'southern soul', beginning back in 1954 through to 1962,.I immediately want to deliver a 'star pick' rating to the first volume., ultimately, its clear that the two sets are highly complimentary, excellently presented and really should be sitting together on the record shelves.' STAR PICK***** x2. Bob Cole Basement Group Review

    'Listening to the impressive tracks on these 2 CDs, and reading through the full colour 28 page booklet that accompanies it, these influences are mostly easy to identify and associate with. The overall standard of these 54 tracks is amazingly high and there are hours of fun to be had here, in the unlikely event that you ever tire of this collection, there is always the rest of the series to catch up with!' Red Lick Records

    Designed by connoisseurs for connoisseurs, these amazing collections of rare sides have notes written by John Ridley, that great treasure hunter of soul music. Once you’re on the train it moves at breakneck speed. Houston, Nashville, New Orleans, Memphis, Chicago, the stations parade by, never stopping more than three minutes on the same artist, the time it takes to listen to one side of a 45. Some well-known faces sit alongside a genuine crowd of forgotten heroes of soul and rhythm and blues. Perfectly delightful and surprisingly varied. Julien Cure – Soul Bag (France) SOUL022
  • 1955-1962

    The music that led to southern soul is just too good to cram into one volume, so Part 2 of Where Southern Soul Began, showcases many more artists who contributed to the birth of the genre. The songs come from all parts of the south of the US: from New Orleans via Miami and from Mobile, Alabama to Memphis and Nashville. Many of these then unsung heroes such as Ted Taylor, Joe Tex, Otis Redding and William Bell, went on to have highly successful careers, and this set gives a valuable insight into the music they were making before the big hits started coming. Other artists featured are more obscure as they made only a few recordings before fading from view. Yet singers such as Steve Dixon, George Hughley and Prince Conley made just as valid a contribution to the beginnings of southern soul.

    The music here inspired the giants of black American music in the sixties. It combines elements of country, R & B, doo-wop, gospel and blues, and retains the ability to move listeners some 50 years on with its emotional intensity and musical power.

    Soul 002 & 017 Where Southern Soul Began 1 & 2 'These two 2-cd volumes are a fine way to trace the roots of what we now call 'southern soul', beginning back in 1954 through to 1962,.I immediately want to deliver a 'star pick' rating to the first volume., ultimately, its clear that the two sets are highly complimentary, excellently presented and really should be sitting together on the record shelves.' STAR PICK***** x2. Bob Cole Basement Group Review

    SOUL017
  • 1954-1962 The Golden Age of southern soul lasted from about 1964 to 1975, when disco ripped the heart out of it. Although it may seem as if the blend of country, gospel and R & B that emerged from the great studios in Memphis and Muscle Shoals in that decade was entirely new, like any other genre, southern soul absorbed influences from a whole variety of sources. Part of the 'History of Soul' series, these CDs reveal the musical antecedents that gave southern soul its inspiration. A good few of the artists here, represented in their early attempts at creating an individual style, went on to become some of the biggest stars of the '60s. Others, perhaps less famously, provided ideas and techniques that became stylistic standards. If you ever wondered what musical forms anticipated the southern soul explosion, the answer is in these tracks. If you thought that secularised gospel started with Sam Cooke and Ray Charles, think again as you listen to vocalists who pioneered this many years before them. And if you imagined that the producers at Royal Studios, or Fame or Cosimo's in New Orleans invented something completely unprecedented, you were missing something. The accompanying booklet is written by John Ridley. The music here will tell you the real story – and it will knock your socks off too!

    'Listening to the impressive tracks on these 2 CDs, and reading through the full colour 28 page booklet that accompanies it, these influences are mostly easy to identify and associate with. The overall standard of these 54 tracks is amazingly high and there are hours of fun to be had here, in the unlikely event that you ever tire of this collection, there is always the rest of the series to catch up with!' Red Lick Records

    Soul 002 & 017 Where Southern Soul Began 1 & 2 'These two 2-cd volumes are a fine way to trace the roots of what we now call 'southern soul', beginning back in 1954 through to 1962,.I immediately want to deliver a 'star pick' rating to the first volume., ultimately, its clear that the two sets are highly complimentary, excellently presented and really should be sitting together on the record shelves.' STAR PICK***** x2. Bob Cole Basement Group Review

    SOUL002
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    Part of the 'History of Soul' series but a pleasure in its own right, this CD bears witness to the creation of a distinctive, smooth soul sound made in Chicago in the early 1960s that we associate with such legendary figures as Curtis Mayfield, Betty Everett and McKinley Mitchell. Black music was transitioning between R&B and soul at this time, and vocal groups were introducing a new gospel sensibility into their songs.

    The accompanying booklet is written by Robert Pruter, author of the acclaimed 'Chicago Soul'.

    'Contains some absolutely stunning tracks and I applaud the compilers for their selection. To add icing on the cake, the booklet is in the Ace/Kent league when it comes to sheer size and quality written by no other than Robert Pruter.' Keith Rylatt – Manifesto Soul Magazine

    This fine collection brings together the cream of Windy City soul from the years 1950 to 1962. As is often the case with these types of compilations, it's the obscure cuts that make them worthwhile and this one is no exception. Roots & Rhythm

    SOUL001
  • Out of stock

    Rhythm & Blues Records presents a new series of double CDs highlighting the 240 or so songs most frequently performed by British beat and blues artists. Volume One spotlights the pre-Beatles skiffle and folk era and ties this in to the Blues Boom group material of the late 1960s. Three further volumes concentrate on Merseybeat, the London scene and the jazz and soul sounds that influenced the mod movement. In the late 1960s, when US college youth were likely to buy anything British labelled ‘heavy', ‘progressive' or  ‘blues', the brand-leaders of the British Invasion: The Rolling Stones, Fleetwood Mac, Cream, Ten Years After, The Jeff Beck Group and Led Zeppelin were, without exception, born out of the American music included in this fascinating collection.

    Teenagers in post-war America weren't particularly fond of folk, blues or country and western; that was the stuff that their parents liked. Yet to some of their counterparts in ration-book Britain, this music seemed to offer messages from an intriguing culture half a world away. Lonnie Donegan's hit album 'King of Skiffle' engendered a craze among British teenagers for reproducing and even recording these sounds in their suburban bedrooms or provincial youth clubs, on cheap guitars and homemade instruments. The skiffle sound spread like wildfire across the UK before its more discerning practitioners reverted, towards a more rock 'n' roll style, taking their fusion back to North America whence it had come, in a 'British Invasion'.

    R014

  • Out of stock

    Rhythm & Blues Records presents a new series of double CDs highlighting the 240 or so songs most frequently performed by British beat and blues artists. Volume One spotlights the pre-Beatles skiffle and folk era and ties this in to the Blues Boom group material of the late 1960s. Three further volumes concentrate on Merseybeat, the London scene and the jazz and soul sounds that influenced the mod movement. In the late 1960s, when US college youth were likely to buy anything British labelled ‘heavy', ‘progressive' or  ‘blues', the brand-leaders of the British Invasion: The Rolling Stones, Fleetwood Mac, Cream, Ten Years After, The Jeff Beck Group and Led Zeppelin were, without exception, born out of the American music included in this fascinating collection.

    Teenagers in post-war America weren't particularly fond of folk, blues or country and western; that was the stuff that their parents liked. Yet to some of their counterparts in ration-book Britain, this music seemed to offer messages from an intriguing culture half a world away. Lonnie Donegan's hit album 'King of Skiffle' engendered a craze among British teenagers for reproducing and even recording these sounds in their suburban bedrooms or provincial youth clubs, on cheap guitars and homemade instruments. The skiffle sound spread like wildfire across the UK before its more discerning practitioners reverted, towards a more rock 'n' roll style, taking their fusion back to North America whence it had come, in a 'British Invasion'.

    R013

  • Rhythm & Blues Records presents a new series of double CDs highlighting the 240 or so songs most frequently performed by British beat and blues artists. Volume One spotlights the pre-Beatles skiffle and folk era and ties this in to the Blues Boom group material of the late 1960s. Three further volumes concentrate on Merseybeat, the London scene and the jazz and soul sounds that influenced the mod movement. In the late 1960s, when US college youth were likely to buy anything British labelled ‘heavy', ‘progressive' or  ‘blues', the brand-leaders of the British Invasion: The Rolling Stones, Fleetwood Mac, Cream, Ten Years After, The Jeff Beck Group and Led Zeppelin were, without exception, born out of the American music included in this fascinating collection.

    Teenagers in post-war America weren't particularly fond of folk, blues or country and western; that was the stuff that their parents liked. Yet to some of their counterparts in ration-book Britain, this music seemed to offer messages from an intriguing culture half a world away. Lonnie Donegan's hit album 'King of Skiffle' engendered a craze among British teenagers for reproducing and even recording these sounds in their suburban bedrooms or provincial youth clubs, on cheap guitars and homemade instruments. The skiffle sound spread like wildfire across the UK before its more discerning practitioners reverted, towards a more rock 'n' roll style, taking their fusion back to North America whence it had come, in a 'British Invasion'.

    R006

  • Out of stock

    Rhythm & Blues Records presents a new series of double CDs highlighting the 240 or so songs most frequently performed by British beat and blues artists. Volume One spotlights the pre-Beatles skiffle and folk era and ties this in to the Blues Boom group material of the late 1960s. Three further volumes concentrate on Merseybeat, the London scene and the jazz and soul sounds that influenced the mod movement. In the late 1960s, when US college youth were likely to buy anything British labelled ‘heavy', ‘progressive' or  ‘blues', the brand-leaders of the British Invasion: The Rolling Stones, Fleetwood Mac, Cream, Ten Years After, The Jeff Beck Group and Led Zeppelin were, without exception, born out of the American music included in this fascinating collection.

    Teenagers in post-war America weren't particularly fond of folk, blues or country and western; that was the stuff that their parents liked. Yet to some of their counterparts in ration-book Britain, this music seemed to offer messages from an intriguing culture half a world away. Lonnie Donegan's hit album 'King of Skiffle' engendered a craze among British teenagers for reproducing and even recording these sounds in their suburban bedrooms or provincial youth clubs, on cheap guitars and homemade instruments. The skiffle sound spread like wildfire across the UK before its more discerning practitioners reverted, towards a more rock 'n' roll style, taking their fusion back to North America whence it had come, in a 'British Invasion'.

    R005

  • Rhythm & Blues Records presents a new series of double CDs highlighting the 240 or so songs most frequently performed by British beat and blues artists. Volume One spotlights the pre-Beatles skiffle and folk era and ties this in to the Blues Boom group material of the late 1960s. Three further volumes concentrate on Merseybeat, the London scene and the jazz and soul sounds that influenced the mod movement. In the late 1960s, when US college youth were likely to buy anything British labelled ‘heavy', ‘progressive' or  ‘blues', the brand-leaders of the British Invasion: The Rolling Stones, Fleetwood Mac, Cream, Ten Years After, The Jeff Beck Group and Led Zeppelin were, without exception, born out of the American music included in this fascinating collection.

    Teenagers in post-war America weren't particularly fond of folk, blues or country and western; that was the stuff that their parents liked. Yet to some of their counterparts in ration-book Britain, this music seemed to offer messages from an intriguing culture half a world away. Lonnie Donegan's hit album 'King of Skiffle' engendered a craze among British teenagers for reproducing and even recording these sounds in their suburban bedrooms or provincial youth clubs, on cheap guitars and homemade instruments. The skiffle sound spread like wildfire across the UK before its more discerning practitioners reverted, towards a more rock 'n' roll style, taking their fusion back to North America whence it had come, in a 'British Invasion'.

    R016

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    Manchester Free Trade Hall was host to two concerts on Sunday October 21st 1962 that acted as a catalyst to the nascent British Blues & R&B boom, on the verge of breaking out of its suburban home in Ealing, West London. The shows were promoted by Stockport-based Paddy MacKiernan under the Jazz Unlimited banner and attracted a crowd of around two thousand enthusiasts, who saw the first major concert in Britain to feature American bluesmen. Manchester was the only UK date on the 1962 American Folk-Blues Festival tour and it was attended by blues fans from all over the country through what Paul Jones called ‘the bush telegraph’. With Jones were Alexis Korner and Macclesfield-born John Mayall, plus extraordinarily a contingent of younger fans who had made the trip in a clapped out van from London. Why extraordinary? Because the van contained some of the future superstars of the British scene: Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Brian Jones and Jimmy Page. The Stones by this time had just a dozen gigs under their belts and Page had recently embarked on the first stage of his career as a session guitarist. David Williams dedicates a whole chapter to the road trip in his book The First Time We Met The Blues. “It must have been around early September 1962 when news filtered down the grapevine…We could hardly believe that real blues artists were going to appear here in our country…were regarded somewhat like mystic gods within our circle…(Jimmy Page) realised that he would not be able to make the journey with us as he was already booked to play a gig with Neil Christian on the Saturday night…it was agreed Jim would travel up by train on the Sunday and we would find space for him in the van for the journey back overnight…Graham (Ackers) was a pretty good driver and soon managed to find his way through Central London to a square ...where we picked up Mick, Keith and Brian.” Keith Richards remembers it differently, “Mick sometimes had the use of his parents’ Triumph Herald at the weekend and I remember we went to see a big blues show in Manchester.” Jimmy Page: “When David Williams told me of the impending visit of the initial American Folk-Blues Festival to England, I was keen to join the pilgrimage to Manchester. It was not only the first time that I would actually see artists like John Lee Hooker and T-Bone Walker perform, but it was also the first time I met Mick Jagger, Brian Jones and Keith Richards, who came with us on the trip. We were all like-minded enthusiasts and in those days we regarded the artists we were going to see as idols.” ABC TV filmed the second show and broadcast it in two parts for its Tempo programme. The recordings (from the Newby collection) are of excellent sound quality and were taken off air by direct line into a Tandberg reel to reel recorder. RANDB059
  • Out of stock
    We know that the Stones built their early career on songs originally performed by The Holy Trinity - Chuck Berry, Bo Diddley and Jimmy Reed. But did you know that the Stones also performed songs made famous by Elvis Presley, Ritchie Valens and the Shadows? It’s all here – fully documented and sounding terrific. We focus on the seminal years 1962- 1965 as the Stones evolved from duplicating the music made by their American idols and start to give it their own distinctive treatment. Even after fifty years these 27 tracks tells us a lot about the musical DNA of the Rolling Stones. Dig in! A series of CDs analysing the songs and styles that inspired the Rolling Stones with fully illustrated 24-page booklet. RANDB056
  • Out of stock
    We know that the Stones built their early career on songs originally performed by The Holy Trinity - Chuck Berry, Bo Diddley and Jimmy Reed. But did you know that the Stones also performed songs made famous by Elvis Presley, Ritchie Valens and the Shadows? It’s all here – fully documented and sounding terrific. We focus on the seminal years 1962- 1965 as the Stones evolved from duplicating the music made by their American idols and start to give it their own distinctive treatment. Even after fifty years these 27 tracks tells us a lot about the musical DNA of the Rolling Stones. Dig in! A series of CDs analysing the songs and styles that inspired the Rolling Stones with fully illustrated 24-page booklet. R007
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    WHO BEGINNINGS Vol1

    £4.00
    Pete Townshend might have been the most articulate songwriter of his generation but like every other band of their era , The Who cut their teeth on cover versions which influenced how their sound developed. From their first gigs The Who were open to a wide range of influences including rhythm and blues, soul, country, jazz, surf, rock ’n’ roll and classical. And it’s all here, in great sound and with a full explanation of what every track meant to The Who. At least three of the cover versions in this collection subsequently mutated into “originals” - see if you can spot them! This CD analyses the songs and styles that inspired The Who and includes a fully illustrated 24-page booklet. R009