CDs

  • Sale!
    No artist works in a vacuum. Young men of their time, passionate music lovers who in their formative years had access to an unprecedented range of pop music thanks to Brian Epstein's NEMS record shop, Lennon, McCartney and Harrison listened, borrowed and reshaped quite an array of tracks, processing these borrowings into their own unmistakable sound. Named after their first publishing company, this CD, with accompanying booklet, sheds light on the Beatles' creative process. Listen to these tracks and see how some of the best loved songs in pop music were formed. R015
  • Out of stock
    Full tracklisting tbc
  • Virtuoso blues guitarist Bobby Parker inspired John Lennon, Eric Clapton, Carlos Santana, Jimmy Page and many others yet it has taken 66 years since his recording debut for a proper compilation to be issued under his name. The one you all know, Watch your Step was played on stage by the Beatles in their Hamburg days who by their own admission, took its riff to fashion the opening to I Feel Fine. And let’s not forget Led Zeppelin’s Moby Dick, which borrowed that same riff. What a great soulful blues singer Bobby Parker was too. From his 1956 recording of Titanic, to 1969’s It's Hard But It's Fair, we present some unforgettable vocal performances plus guitar instrumentals that showcase his unique way of playing the blues. And there are some unreleased live performances from a radio show broadcast in 1995. Bobby Parker originals are hard to come by – apart from the hit Watch your Step, everything else is a valuable collector’s item. But this compilation brings them all together in one set and we can promise a treat in store for you. An excellent new 2CD compilation…offers the listener a deep dive into the legacy of a historically significant artist, meriting attention from anyone who can appreciate an organic fusion of blues, soul, a bit of doo-wop and prototypical rock…Bobby Parker’s timeless recordings still pulsate with personality, righteous energy, superb musicianship and soulful flair. If you don’t already know that fact firsthand, Soul Of The Blues is here to enlighten and entertain. Roger Wood Living Blues This is how all compilations should be done Dave Penny Blues & Rhythm This two-CD set – the first-ever compilation that focuses solely on his music – should change that. One listen, and you’ll be wondering why he flew under the radar for so long… Run, don’t walk, to buy this one. Bobby Parker was a treasure. This one’s going on my short list for historical album of the year, and, once you hear it, you’ll probably feel the same way, too. Marty Gunther Blues Blast Magazine (R&B Records) should be congratulated on putting together a comprehensive collection of hard to find material John Mitchell Blues In Britain All in all the 52 tracks here are a veritable treasure trove of wonderful music. And the presentation of the CD set is superb with a sumptuous booklet…I can’t recommend (it) strongly enough…The definitive Bobby Parker is a dream come true for fans like me – this is the best reissue CD of 2020 for sure. Don’t you dare miss it! John Ridley RANDB060
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    Part of the 'History of Soul' series but a pleasure in its own right, this CD bears witness to the creation of a distinctive, smooth soul sound made in Chicago in the early 1960s that we associate with such legendary figures as Curtis Mayfield, Betty Everett and McKinley Mitchell. Black music was transitioning between R&B and soul at this time, and vocal groups were introducing a new gospel sensibility into their songs.

    The accompanying booklet is written by Robert Pruter, author of the acclaimed 'Chicago Soul'.

    'Contains some absolutely stunning tracks and I applaud the compilers for their selection. To add icing on the cake, the booklet is in the Ace/Kent league when it comes to sheer size and quality written by no other than Robert Pruter.' Keith Rylatt – Manifesto Soul Magazine

    This fine collection brings together the cream of Windy City soul from the years 1950 to 1962. As is often the case with these types of compilations, it's the obscure cuts that make them worthwhile and this one is no exception. Roots & Rhythm

    SOUL001
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    Volume Two 1962-1965 African American popular music was mostly known as Rhythm and Blues in 1962, the beginning of the era covered in this collection. But by the end of the period, 1965, the music was universally called Soul. The Chicago music industry exploded with the growth of soul music in this period, producing thousands of records and dozens and dozens of new labels. The two biggest black music labels Vee-Jay and Chess led in the creation of the Chicago soul brand with names familiar and not so familiar: the former with Etta James and Tony Adams and the latter with Gene Chandler and Moss Tolbert. And yet it's the smaller labels that make up the bulk of the Chicago story: Conlo with Jamo Thomas, Blue Rock with Otis Leaville, Ja-Wes with Sandra Stephens and it's here that we explore some of the finest sounds of the era in this collection.

    SOUL032
  • SIDE ONE 1. Down Home 2. Love For Sale 3. I Married An Angel (take one) 4. Landslide 5. I Married An Angel (take two) 6. Announcements1. 7. Down Home (take one) 8. Minor Incident 9. Gypsy 10. Bang (take one) 11. Bang (take two) 12. Down Home (take two) 13. Announcements R&B18 SLIMLINE Produced as CD-R (professionally manufactured recordable CD printed for short run) as opposed to CD-P (professionally manufactured pressed CDs made in quantities of 500+). All CDs whether CD-R or CD-P are 100% guaranteed error free. Discs will always be replaced if any problems are encountered.
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    1. Sunday Lunch
    2. Off The Wagon
    3. Inner Urge
    4. You Don’t Know What Love Is
    5. Le Roi
    BBC Paris Theatre, London, June 11th 1967
    1. The Whims of Chambers
    2. Le Roi
    3. My Ship
    4. Inner Urge
    5. No Room For Squares
    6. You Don’t Know What Love Is
    7. Don’t Fall Off The Bridge
    BBC Playhouse Theatre, London, October 18th 1967 Dick Morrissey (tenor saxophone); Harry South (piano); Phil Bates (bass): Bill Eyden (drums) Introduced by Humphrey Lyttelton
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    There was way too much great early soul, R & B and blues being produced in New York City to squeeze onto one double CD, so here we are again with another selection of the best. Several artists on this new compilation are very well known: Ray Charles, Little Willie John and Ike & Tine Turner for example, but many others less so. It speaks volumes about the wealth of talent in the Big Apple around the turn of the 60s that gifted singers such as Ruby Roberson, Bobby Long and Betty O’Brien never quite made the grade.

    There is considerable variation in styles here too, from rough, untutored voices like King Coleman and Vernon Harrell to consummate stylists such as Chuck Jackson, Gladys Knight and of course Aretha Franklin. But alley blues and sophisticated uptown ballads alike played their part in the development of soul music. And therefore all the tracks on these CDs well deserve their inclusion in our History Of Soul series. Enjoy!

    'First off I must say that having discovered your compilations earlier this year - both r'n'b and soul - I am completely blown away by the breadth and depth, quality and value of these compilations. They immediately became 'must buys' until your release rate caused me to slow down before I bankrupted myself. Keep up the good work.' Malcolm Beattie (Rnb and Soul fan)

    SOUL019
    1. Jailhouse Rock
    2. Interview
    3. Paint It Black
    4. See See Rider
    5. The Same Thing
    6. Interview
    7. When I Was Young
    8. A Love Like Yours
    9. Connection
    10. If I Were A Carpenter
    11. Shake, Rattle & Roll
    12. McCullough's Rockin' Blues
    13. Yes I´m Experienced
    14. It’s All Meat
    15. San Franciscan Nights
    16. All Night Long
    17. Good Times
    18. I Get So Excited
    19. Interview
    20. San Franciscan Nights
    21. Anything
    22. Interview
    23. Monterey
    24. All Night Long
    25. Orange & Red Beams
    26. Monterey
    27. Interview
    28. It Hurts Me Too
    29. White Houses
    30. Landscape
  • In a comprehensive overview from 1927 to 1963, History of Soul Records’ 8CD anthology covers the genesis of soul music, tracing connections between R&B, jazz and blues, and gospel, the secular and the sacred. As popular black musical genres were adopted by white teenage audiences in the 1950s, black music reverted to more authentic, basic styles. By 1960, the sound of black popular music had turned away from a driving, largely uptempo rhythm and blues towards a more emotionally poignant style. The term ‘soul’ popped up here and there, but only became common parlance after the release of Ray Charles’s I Believe To My Soul at the end of 1959.

    The growing Civil Rights movement, the rise of the 45rpm record and the introduction of the electric guitar all played their part in the creation of a new sound. Detroit had Berry Gordy’s Motown, Chicago had Curtis Mayfield and the Impressions and New York had Atlantic Records along with white songwriters Burt Bacharach and Jerry Ragavoy producing their uptown soul. Down south, Stax was setting Memphis alight, Fame were starting up in Muscle Shoals, and New Orleans was putting funk into the mix. By 1963, soul had gone mainstream. There were more soulful records in the charts in 1962 alone than there had been in the whole of the 1950s.

    This collection of breathtaking blues and spiritual music brings you some of the most impassioned, compelling vocal performances ever to be recorded. The accompanying illustrated 36-page book sets out the historical background and explains some of the technical features that make these beautiful songs the precursors of soul music.

    WHAT THE CRITICS SAY

    This one is a corker...every bit as epic as it sounds... It’s hard to know where to begin with such a monumental and thorough anthology – especially one as full of highlights as this

    Lauren Laverne BBC 6 Music

    Mammoth and magnificent anthology...While there can be no package large enough to represent all the players, Sacred To Secular has a worthy stab at it, excavating as close as possible to the core and acting both as a cultural document and an excellent crash course in one of music’s most epochal periods. Fiona Sturges Uncut

    Embrace this journey through a lost era...the real thrill lies in discovering lesser names especially from the fringes of gospel, whose work is every bit as stirring Clive Davies Sunday Times 

    It’s common knowledge that soul developed largely from gospel; but that journey has never been as extensively mapped as on this eight-CD compilation 5 star review in The Independent

    SOUL021
  • In a comprehensive overview from 1927 to 1963, History of Soul Records’ 8CD anthology covers the genesis of soul music, tracing connections between R&B, jazz and blues, and gospel, the secular and the sacred. As popular black musical genres were adopted by white teenage audiences in the 1950s, black music reverted to more authentic, basic styles. By 1960, the sound of black popular music had turned away from a driving, largely uptempo rhythm and blues towards a more emotionally poignant style. The term ‘soul’ popped up here and there, but only became common parlance after the release of Ray Charles’s I Believe To My Soul at the end of 1959.

    The growing Civil Rights movement, the rise of the 45rpm record and the introduction of the electric guitar all played their part in the creation of a new sound. Detroit had Berry Gordy’s Motown, Chicago had Curtis Mayfield and the Impressions and New York had Atlantic Records along with white songwriters Burt Bacharach and Jerry Ragavoy producing their uptown soul. Down south, Stax was setting Memphis alight, Fame were starting up in Muscle Shoals, and New Orleans was putting funk into the mix. By 1963, soul had gone mainstream. There were more soulful records in the charts in 1962 alone than there had been in the whole of the 1950s.

    This collection of breathtaking blues and spiritual music brings you some of the most impassioned, compelling vocal performances ever to be recorded. The accompanying illustrated 36-page book sets out the historical background and explains some of the technical features that make these beautiful songs the precursors of soul music.

    WHAT THE CRITICS SAY

    This one is a corker...every bit as epic as it sounds... It’s hard to know where to begin with such a monumental and thorough anthology – especially one as full of highlights as this

    Lauren Laverne BBC 6 Music

    Mammoth and magnificent anthology...While there can be no package large enough to represent all the players, Sacred To Secular has a worthy stab at it, excavating as close as possible to the core and acting both as a cultural document and an excellent crash course in one of music’s most epochal periods. Fiona Sturges Uncut

    Embrace this journey through a lost era...the real thrill lies in discovering lesser names especially from the fringes of gospel, whose work is every bit as stirring Clive Davies Sunday Times 

    It’s common knowledge that soul developed largely from gospel; but that journey has never been as extensively mapped as on this eight-CD compilation 5 star review in The Independent

    SOUL021 Produced as CD-R (professionally manufactured recordable CD printed for short run) as opposed to CD-P (professionally manufactured pressed CDs made in quantities of 500+). All CDs whether CD-R or CD-P are 100% guaranteed error free. Discs will always be replaced if any problems are encountered.
  • What you have on this 2CD set is a glimpse into Georgie Fame’s world circa 1964/65. It comprises 45 songs recorded for the BBC and others between 1964 and 1965 (mostly in excellent quality sound), including two exciting live audience performances broadcast direct from the legendary Ricky Tick Club in Windsor. Fame was different; he played soul, blues, dance music, ballads, ska/blue beat, vocalese, big band jazz, hillbilly, New Orleans and even World Music, decades before that term was invented. For anyone who wishes to explore this world, the 2CD set you have here offers the very best of guided tours. To quote Georgie from “Night Train”: All aboard children! 16 page booklet with notes by Dave Stephens.
  • Disc One
    1. Introduction & Interview
    2. Saturday Night Fish Fry
    3. Interview on arrangements
    4. Yeh Yeh (1)
    5. Preach And Teach
    6. Interview on being #1
    7. Yeh Yeh (2)
    8. Tell All The World About You
    9. Let The Sunshine In
    10. Interview on success in USA
    11. In The Meantime (1)
    12. Point Of No Return (1)
    13. Telegram
    14. Yeh Yeh (3)
    15. Interview on Johnny Burch
    16. In The Meantime (2)
    17. Get On The Right Track, Baby
    18. Interview on the follow up
    19. Like We Used To Be (1)
    20. Rockin‘ Pneumonia Boogie Woogie Flu
    21. No No
    22. Move It On Over
    23. Interview on dancing
    24. Like We Used To Be (2)
    25. Monkeying Around
    26. Point Of No Return (2)
    27. Interview on John Mayall
    28. Something
    29. Ride Your Pony
    30. The World Is Round
    31. Interview on jazz
    32. My Girl
    33. Boot-leg
     
    Disc Two
    1. Interview on Sweet Thing
    2. Sweet Thing (1)
    3. Funny How Time Slips Away
    4. See-Saw
    5. Uptight
    6. Interview with Lulu
    7. Call Me
    8. You'll Never Leave Him
    9. Interview on Get Away
    10. Get Away (1)
    11. Last Night
    12. Close The Door
    13. Interview on going to USA
    14. Get Away (2)
    15. Sweet Thing (2)
    16. Sunny (1)
    17. Interview on Sound Venture
    18. Dawn Yawn
    19. Lovey Dovey
    20. Papa’s Got A Brand New Bag
    21. Interview on Harry South
    22. Keep Your Big Mouth Shut
    23. Three Blind Mice
    24. Do The Dog
    25. Interview on end of the Blue Flames
    26. Because I Love You
    27. Point Of No Return (3)
    28. Waiting Time
    29. Interview on New York
    30. El Pussycat
    31. Sunny (2)
     
  • Sale!
    An exemplary tribute to an unjustly neglected figure - Richard Williams A perfect potted history of the period - Dave Gelly, The Observer An overdue recognition of the genius of Harry South and the world class calibre of the musicians he worked with. An important landmark in British Jazz and indispensable to any collection. – Eddie Little Superb tribute to a stalwart jazz pianist,composer and arranger. Excellent booklet notes by saxophonist Simon Spillett. Highly recommended – Amazon Superbly annotated, this is a reissue of exemplary quality – Peter Vacher, Jazz Rag The Songbook is the definitive Harry South release…makes a strong case for South’s musical contributions to jazz…Lovers of modern big band jazz will find much to discover in this well-conceived set.  Scott Yanow - The New York City Jazz Record RANDB040
  • Sale!
    (shipped with booklet & CD inlays but without jewel case for cheaper airmail and less problems with EU customs) An exemplary tribute to an unjustly neglected figure - Richard Williams A perfect potted history of the period - Dave Gelly, The Observer An overdue recognition of the genius of Harry South and the world class calibre of the musicians he worked with. An important landmark in British Jazz and indispensable to any collection. – Eddie Little Superb tribute to a stalwart jazz pianist,composer and arranger. Excellent booklet notes by saxophonist Simon Spillett. Highly recommended – Amazon Superbly annotated, this is a reissue of exemplary quality – Peter Vacher, Jazz Rag The Songbook is the definitive Harry South release…makes a strong case for South’s musical contributions to jazz…Lovers of modern big band jazz will find much to discover in this well-conceived set.  Scott Yanow - The New York City Jazz Record RANDB040
  • 1. Storm Warning Harry South Big Band 2. Raga (edit) Harry South Big Band 3. Sound Of Seventeen Harry South Big Band 4. Limited Freedom Harry South Big Band 5. Southern Horizons Joe Harriot Quintet 6. Minor Incident Dick Morrissey Quartet 7. Black Eyed Peas Harry South Big Band 8. The Sweeney Harry South Big Band 9. 4 Dimensions Of Greta Harry South Big Band R&B12
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    THE HARRY SOUTH BIG BAND WITH GEORGIE FAME AND THE DICK MORRISSEY QUARTET When the BBC invited pianist/composer and arranger Harry South to front his own big band for a special edition of its flagship radio programme Jazz Club in 1960, few could have predicted the broadcast’s fall-out. Although the Beeb would offer a similar helping hand to other British jazzmen in the decade ahead – making big band leaders of a range of leading figures from Humphrey Lyttelton to Stan Tracey – none of these other bands evolved quite like South's. Beginning as a showcase for his distinctive, often darkly dramatic, original material, and operating as a 'jobs for the boys' forum for those British modernists he felt closest too (among them Tubby Hayes, Dick Morrissey and Joe Harriott) the sheer clout of South's star-packed aggregation ensured it soon attracted interest from outside the normally closed borders of jazz purism. Indeed, when Yeh Yeh hitmaker Georgie Fame decided to pursue his wider musical ambitions, he chose South and his big band as his collaborators, creating the album Sound Venture, a cross-over classic that has become one of the iconic LPs of the decade. Assembled from South's own tape archive, and featuring a wealth of PREVIOUSLY UNISSUED material, including NINE killer Georgie Fame tracks, Further South is both a prequel and sequel to that landmark achievement, a four-disc document of one of the most vibrant times in British music, a souvenir from the days when Swinging London created its very own sound from a heady amalgam of small band Hard Bop, Big Band Swing, R&B and Soul. Containing no fewer than ten complete radio sessions by South's big band (and two by the Dick Morrissey Quartet) and packaged with rare period photographs and an extensive booklet essay by award-winning saxophonist and author Simon Spillett, this set is a must-have for all fans of British modernism. RANDB051 These Harry South Big Band broadcast recordings contain modern big band jazz of quite extraordinary power and dynamism - rarely, if ever, equalled since. The Band - led by conductor/arranger/composer South- has just about every modern jazz star of the 1960's including such luminaries as Tubby Hayes,Ronnie Scott and Dick Morrissey in the sax sections on offer. The Band rips it up on just about every track and culminates - in CD 4 - with Georgie Fame at the microphone with the band in full swing behind him. All in all, a truly remarkable catalogue of music making. But, a word of warning, these recordings are of BBC broadcasts of "Jazz Club" and (I believe) are taken from tapes made of the various transmissions by Harry South himself and are definitely not "Hi-Fi" or anything approaching it - but they are nevertheless priceless in their rarity and musical excellence. In addition to the Big Band broadcasts there are some wonderful sessions recorded by the Dick Morrissey Quartet with no less than Harry South himself on piano and the titanic drumming of Phil Seaman on offer. All in all a fitting tribute to a marvellous set of musicians playing at the peak of their powers in the 1960's - with the caveat for the audiophiles alongst us as to the far less then perfect sound reproduction! Jonny Dee
  • Sale!
    THE HARRY SOUTH BIG BAND WITH GEORGIE FAME AND THE DICK MORRISSEY QUARTET When the BBC invited pianist/composer and arranger Harry South to front his own big band for a special edition of its flagship radio programme Jazz Club in 1960, few could have predicted the broadcast’s fall-out. Although the Beeb would offer a similar helping hand to other British jazzmen in the decade ahead – making big band leaders of a range of leading figures from Humphrey Lyttelton to Stan Tracey – none of these other bands evolved quite like South's. Beginning as a showcase for his distinctive, often darkly dramatic, original material, and operating as a 'jobs for the boys' forum for those British modernists he felt closest too (among them Tubby Hayes, Dick Morrissey and Joe Harriott) the sheer clout of South's star-packed aggregation ensured it soon attracted interest from outside the normally closed borders of jazz purism. Indeed, when Yeh Yeh hitmaker Georgie Fame decided to pursue his wider musical ambitions, he chose South and his big band as his collaborators, creating the album Sound Venture, a cross-over classic that has become one of the iconic LPs of the decade. Assembled from South's own tape archive, and featuring a wealth of PREVIOUSLY UNISSUED material, including NINE killer Georgie Fame tracks, Further South is both a prequel and sequel to that landmark achievement, a four-disc document of one of the most vibrant times in British music, a souvenir from the days when Swinging London created its very own sound from a heady amalgam of small band Hard Bop, Big Band Swing, R&B and Soul. Containing no fewer than ten complete radio sessions by South's big band (and two by the Dick Morrissey Quartet) and packaged with rare period photographs and an extensive booklet essay by award-winning saxophonist and author Simon Spillett, this set is a must-have for all fans of British modernism. RANDB051 These Harry South Big Band broadcast recordings contain modern big band jazz of quite extraordinary power and dynamism - rarely, if ever, equalled since. The Band - led by conductor/arranger/composer South- has just about every modern jazz star of the 1960's including such luminaries as Tubby Hayes,Ronnie Scott and Dick Morrissey in the sax sections on offer. The Band rips it up on just about every track and culminates - in CD 4 - with Georgie Fame at the microphone with the band in full swing behind him. All in all, a truly remarkable catalogue of music making. But, a word of warning, these recordings are of BBC broadcasts of "Jazz Club" and (I believe) are taken from tapes made of the various transmissions by Harry South himself and are definitely not "Hi-Fi" or anything approaching it - but they are nevertheless priceless in their rarity and musical excellence. In addition to the Big Band broadcasts there are some wonderful sessions recorded by the Dick Morrissey Quartet with no less than Harry South himself on piano and the titanic drumming of Phil Seaman on offer. All in all a fitting tribute to a marvellous set of musicians playing at the peak of their powers in the 1960's - with the caveat for the audiophiles alongst us as to the far less then perfect sound reproduction! Jonny Dee
  • The History of Rhythm and Blues series of CDs brings you the accidental synthesis of jazz, gospel, blues, ragtime, country, pop and Latin into a definable form of black music, which would influence pretty well all popular music from the 1950s to the present. It is the first attempt to put together a cross-label compilation showcasing the most important and influential records in the rise of Rhythm & Blues. This exhilarating compilation …is a distillation of a four-CD set; as such, it’s an exceptionally strong collection, each of the 25 tracks a discovery, a joy. The liner notes are worth the price in themselves: Well-written and entertaining, they detail not only the history of each artist, but the context of each song…The most recent song on the album was recorded more than 65 years ago, but this is no dusty exercise in musicology. This is creative, vibrant music. Even today, it quickens the pulse. M.D.Spenser Blog May 2009 Anyone looking for a great sampler to hear some of the classic early rhythm and blues could do worse than to check out this 25-track release…As an introduction to early blues and more this compilation takes some beating – and to anyone doing research or a historian – I would imagine pretty essential, well done to compiler, Nick Duckett and to all concerned. GRAHAME RHODES RANDB002
  • Disc One Commonwealth Jazz Orchestra August 30th 1965
    1. Change Of Setting
    2. Blues For Pipkins
    3. Double Stopper
    4. The Song Is You
    5. Whisper Not
    6. 100% Proof
    7. Blame It On My Youth
    8. Wives and Lovers
    9. I Never Know When To Say When
    10. What’s Blue?
    Disc Two Tubby Hayes Quartet January 25th 1965
    1. Mini Minor
    2. Con Alma
    3. Sometime Ago
    4. Souriya
    5. So What
    July 12th 1965* (low fidelity recording)
    1. Change Of Setting
    2. Alone Together
    3. Sometime Ago
    4. Spring Can Really Hang You Up The Most
    5. Don’t Fall Off The Bridge
       
  • Out of stock

    Rhythm & Blues Records presents a new series of double CDs highlighting the 240 or so songs most frequently performed by British beat and blues artists. Volume One spotlights the pre-Beatles skiffle and folk era and ties this in to the Blues Boom group material of the late 1960s. Three further volumes concentrate on Merseybeat, the London scene and the jazz and soul sounds that influenced the mod movement. In the late 1960s, when US college youth were likely to buy anything British labelled ‘heavy', ‘progressive' or  ‘blues', the brand-leaders of the British Invasion: The Rolling Stones, Fleetwood Mac, Cream, Ten Years After, The Jeff Beck Group and Led Zeppelin were, without exception, born out of the American music included in this fascinating collection.

    Teenagers in post-war America weren't particularly fond of folk, blues or country and western; that was the stuff that their parents liked. Yet to some of their counterparts in ration-book Britain, this music seemed to offer messages from an intriguing culture half a world away. Lonnie Donegan's hit album 'King of Skiffle' engendered a craze among British teenagers for reproducing and even recording these sounds in their suburban bedrooms or provincial youth clubs, on cheap guitars and homemade instruments. The skiffle sound spread like wildfire across the UK before its more discerning practitioners reverted, towards a more rock 'n' roll style, taking their fusion back to North America whence it had come, in a 'British Invasion'.

    R013

  • Rhythm & Blues Records presents a new series of double CDs highlighting the 240 or so songs most frequently performed by British beat and blues artists. Volume One spotlights the pre-Beatles skiffle and folk era and ties this in to the Blues Boom group material of the late 1960s. Three further volumes concentrate on Merseybeat, the London scene and the jazz and soul sounds that influenced the mod movement. In the late 1960s, when US college youth were likely to buy anything British labelled ‘heavy', ‘progressive' or  ‘blues', the brand-leaders of the British Invasion: The Rolling Stones, Fleetwood Mac, Cream, Ten Years After, The Jeff Beck Group and Led Zeppelin were, without exception, born out of the American music included in this fascinating collection.

    Teenagers in post-war America weren't particularly fond of folk, blues or country and western; that was the stuff that their parents liked. Yet to some of their counterparts in ration-book Britain, this music seemed to offer messages from an intriguing culture half a world away. Lonnie Donegan's hit album 'King of Skiffle' engendered a craze among British teenagers for reproducing and even recording these sounds in their suburban bedrooms or provincial youth clubs, on cheap guitars and homemade instruments. The skiffle sound spread like wildfire across the UK before its more discerning practitioners reverted, towards a more rock 'n' roll style, taking their fusion back to North America whence it had come, in a 'British Invasion'.

    R006

  • Out of stock

    Rhythm & Blues Records presents a new series of double CDs highlighting the 240 or so songs most frequently performed by British beat and blues artists. Volume One spotlights the pre-Beatles skiffle and folk era and ties this in to the Blues Boom group material of the late 1960s. Three further volumes concentrate on Merseybeat, the London scene and the jazz and soul sounds that influenced the mod movement. In the late 1960s, when US college youth were likely to buy anything British labelled ‘heavy', ‘progressive' or  ‘blues', the brand-leaders of the British Invasion: The Rolling Stones, Fleetwood Mac, Cream, Ten Years After, The Jeff Beck Group and Led Zeppelin were, without exception, born out of the American music included in this fascinating collection.

    Teenagers in post-war America weren't particularly fond of folk, blues or country and western; that was the stuff that their parents liked. Yet to some of their counterparts in ration-book Britain, this music seemed to offer messages from an intriguing culture half a world away. Lonnie Donegan's hit album 'King of Skiffle' engendered a craze among British teenagers for reproducing and even recording these sounds in their suburban bedrooms or provincial youth clubs, on cheap guitars and homemade instruments. The skiffle sound spread like wildfire across the UK before its more discerning practitioners reverted, towards a more rock 'n' roll style, taking their fusion back to North America whence it had come, in a 'British Invasion'.

    R014

  • Out of stock

    Rhythm & Blues Records presents a new series of double CDs highlighting the 240 or so songs most frequently performed by British beat and blues artists. Volume One spotlights the pre-Beatles skiffle and folk era and ties this in to the Blues Boom group material of the late 1960s. Three further volumes concentrate on Merseybeat, the London scene and the jazz and soul sounds that influenced the mod movement. In the late 1960s, when US college youth were likely to buy anything British labelled ‘heavy', ‘progressive' or  ‘blues', the brand-leaders of the British Invasion: The Rolling Stones, Fleetwood Mac, Cream, Ten Years After, The Jeff Beck Group and Led Zeppelin were, without exception, born out of the American music included in this fascinating collection.

    Teenagers in post-war America weren't particularly fond of folk, blues or country and western; that was the stuff that their parents liked. Yet to some of their counterparts in ration-book Britain, this music seemed to offer messages from an intriguing culture half a world away. Lonnie Donegan's hit album 'King of Skiffle' engendered a craze among British teenagers for reproducing and even recording these sounds in their suburban bedrooms or provincial youth clubs, on cheap guitars and homemade instruments. The skiffle sound spread like wildfire across the UK before its more discerning practitioners reverted, towards a more rock 'n' roll style, taking their fusion back to North America whence it had come, in a 'British Invasion'.

    R005